WO, Officer’s, and CPO Uniform Regulations

Officer’s Uniforms 1895 – 1922
Overview
Recreating the period uniforms of commissioned and warrant officers isn’t a simple matter. Unlike the uniforms of enlisted men, these uniforms are comparatively rare, plus originals from the period will be small in size in comparison to the average sizes of today. It should be noted that uniforms from this period were not available “off the rack”, but custom tailored for each individual by private tailors and high class commercial haberdashers such as Brookes Brothers. Naval tailors were to be found close by the gates of many navy yards and installations, eager to provide every sort of uniform item and service.
Reproducing these uniforms is a costly affair. Be prepared to spend from $500 – $1,200 for the basics. Remember that many of the insignias must be custom embroidered by hand from genuine gold and silver wire. The gold stripes on the sleeves, shoulder boards, and chin straps are actually made from gilded wire. Suspenders or “braces” were worn with trousers. Shirts were made with detachable collars (and cuffs in some instances).
The officer corps was divided into two branches: the Line and Staff. Line officers were the warriors, educated and trained in navigation, tactics, history, science, marlinspike seamanship, engineering, law of the sea, electricity, & technology. Their jobs were to lead & command. Line officers took precedence over all officers. Staff corps officers were paymasters, chaplains, medical doctors, dentists, steam engineers, naval constructors, professors of mathematics, civil engineers whose career paths supported the fleet and shore establishment of the navy.
The everyday uniform was “service dress”. It was always blue unless the white uniform was specified. It is the reason this chapter begins with this uniform. The style of the coat remained unchanged over the decades. The only changes were in how the stripes, staff corps, and collar devices were to be worn.
The cap, sword, shoes, cloak, overcoat, and gloves saw little change.
Included below are the actual citations quoted from Naval Uniform Regulations for each year they were issued. They are here to describe and illustrate how the uniform was worn in succeeding years and for those that may be interested in recreating the uniform.
Links are cited at the end of this chapter for sources of materials, suppliers, and resources.

Service Coat
Authorised on 16 January 1877, the Coat was worn with lustrous black mohair braid for rank markings (“sleeve ornaments”) on the sleeves. No line or staff corps insignias were worn on the sleeve or collar until 12 June 1897.
Gold stripes and star of the line officer were authorized on 12 June 1897, (circular number 79). This style coat was worn until 1 January 1922 when the current double breasted sack coat was phased in for all officers, chief warrant, and warrant officers.

1886 Regulations:
“To be worn at all times not already provided for.
Blue or white service-coat, blue or white trousers, blue cap or helmet, as ordered by the senior officer present. The service sword-belt is to be worn, with sword attached, on all duty with enlisted men under arms or when away from the ship on service. The sword is to be at hand when on watch. When on duty with the naval brigade or landing party leggings shall be worn, and such arms, equipments, and extra clothing as the nature of the service may require. A binocular, or spy-glass, shall be carried by the officer of the deck in port.
A deck trumpet shall be carried by the officer of the deck at sea.
White gloves shall always be worn with the sword, except at sea.”
“For all officers, a coat of dark navy-blue cloth or serge shaped to the figure, to descend to top of inseam of trousers; a slit over each hip extending on the right side 5 inches from the bottom of the coat, and on the left side as high as the position of the lower edge of the sword belt; single-breasted, with a ”fly” front fitted with plain, flat, black gutta-percha buttons and a standing collar. The collar, edges of the coat, side seams of the back from the shoulder to the lower edge of the skirt, and edges of the hip slits to 5 inches from bottom of coat shall be trimmed with lustrous black mohair braid 1¼ inches wide laid on flat, beside which, at a distance of one-eighth of an inch, with an overhand turn three-eighths of an inch in diameter at each change of direction, a narrow black silk braid one-eighth of an inch wide shall be placed. On each side of the collar shall be embroidered in high relief, 1 inch in width, the corps badge and grade devices. The grade mark on the sleeve shall be a double thickness of lustrous black braid, showing the same width and disposition as that of gold lace worn on the other coats. The corps distinction on the sleeve shall be omitted.
In warm weather, a similar coat made of white linen duck, trimmed with white linen braid, but without collar devices, shall be worn.
The service coat shall be worn entirely buttoned.

Early Service Coat with black mohair sleeve ornament.
1897 Regulations:
“To be worn at all times not already provided for.
For all officers.—Blue or white service coat, plain blue or white trousers, and blue cap (with white cover if ordered). The service sword belt is to be worn, with sword attached, on. all duty with enlisted men under arms or when away from the ship on service. The sword is to be at hand when on watch.”
“For all officers, a coat of dark navy-blue cloth or serge, shaped to the figure, to descend to top of inseam of trousers; a slit over each hip extending on the right side 5 inches from the bottom of the coat, and on the left side as high as the position of the lower edge of the sword belt; single-breasted, with a “fly” front fitted with plain, flat, black gutta-percha buttons, and a standing collar. The collar, edges of the coat, side seams of the back from the shoulder to the lower edge of the skirt, and edges of the hip slits to 5 inches from bottom of coat shall be trimmed with lustrous black mohair braid l¼ inches wide laid on flat, beside which, at a distance of one-eighth of an inch, with an overhand turn three-eighths of an inch in diameter at each change of direction, a narrow black silk braid one-eighth of an inch wide shall be placed. On each side of the collar shall be embroidered in high relief, 1 inch in width, the corps badge and grade devices.
In warm weather, a similar coat made of white linen duck or cotton twill, trimmed with white braid, but without collar devices, shall be worn. Shoulder straps shall be worn with this coat by commissioned officers.
The service coat shall be worn entirely buttoned.”

Service Coat with gold sleeve ornament.
Service White Coat 1883-1902
In 1883 the White Service Coat was authorised. It was to have sleeve rank in white mohair braid. No line or staff corps insignias were worn.
“In warm weather, a similar coat made of white linen duck or cotton twill, trimmed with white braid, but without collar devices, shall be worn. Shoulder straps shall be worn (after 12 June 1897) with this coat by commissioned officers.
The service coat shall be worn entirely buttoned.”

White Service uniform, Circa 1899
Shoulder Marks
1886 Regulations:
“For all commissioned officers except chaplains the shoulder strap shall be 4¼ inches long and 1½ inches wide including the border, which is to be a quarter of an inch wide, embroidered in dead gold. The center to be of dark navy-blue cloth, upon which are to be embroidered the corps and rank devices as follows:
(NOTE.—The shoulder straps for the Admiral of the Navy shall be 4⅞ inches long and 1⅝ inches wide, including the border, which is to be one-quarter of an inch wide.)”

Captain Shoulder Mark (Strap)
Shoulder Marks
1897 Regulations:
“For all commissioned officers, except chaplains, the shoulder straps shall be 4¼ inches long and 1½ inches wide, including the border, which is to be a quarter of an inch wide, embroidered in dead gold. The center to be of dark, navy-blue cloth, upon which are to be embroidered the corps and rank devices as follows:
EMBROIDERED DEVICES FOR FROGS OF EPAULETS AND FOR SHOULDER STRAPS AND KNOTS.
For rear admirals.—Two similar stars, one near each end of the frog, with a silver foul anchor seven-eighths of an inch long in the center.
For commodores.—One similar star, placed in the center, with a silver foul anchor at each end of the frog.
For captains.—A silver spread eagle in the center, with a silver foul anchor at each end.
For commanders.—A silver oak leaf at each end, with a silver foul anchor in the center.
For lieutenant commanders.—A gold oak leaf at each end, with a silver foul anchor in the center.
For lieutenants.—Two silver bars at each end, with a silver foul anchor in the center.
For lieutenants (junior grade).—One silver bar at each end, with a silver foul anchor in the center.
For ensigns.—A silver foul anchor in the center.
For naval cadets of the line division, who have completed the four years’ course at the Naval Academy.—A gold foul anchor in the center of the pad of the shoulder knot.
Staff officers shall wear on the frog of the epaulet and on the shoulder strap (or knot, in case of naval cadets of the engineer division) the same rank devices as are prescribed for line officers with whom they have relative rank, substituting the proper corps device for the foul anchor. The devices for frogs of epaulets to be the same in dimension as those on the collar of service coat.”
Shoulder Marks
1905 Regulations
“To be worn on the overcoat, mess jacket, and white service coat, the lower end secured at top of sleeve head seams, upper end near seam of collar.
For the Admiral of the Navy and officers of the rank of rear-admiral — to be of blue cloth, lined with black silk, worked over one thickness of haircloth or similar stiffening material. To be 4 ½ to 5 ¼ inches long on the side; 2 ¼ inches wide, with a symmetrical triangular peak at the top extending 1 inch beyond the parallel sides; at the center of this peak a small navy button. Top to be covered with 2-inch gold lace showing a margin of 1/8 -inch blue cloth, and to have worked over the lace the same devices as on shoulder straps.
For captains, commanders, lieutenant-commanders, lieutenants, and staff officers if correspond- ing rank, except chaplains — the same as above, except that grade marks (including the star for line officers, and appropriately colored cloth between the gold-lace stripes for staff officers). similar to those on the sleeve of the service coat of the wearer shall be worn in place of the 2-inch gold lace: the stripes running across the shoulder marks, the lower edge of the lower strip to
be ¼ inch from lower end of the shoulder mark.
For officers of or below the rank of lieutenant, junior grade — the same as above, but the lower edge of the lower strip of lace to be ¾ inch from lower end of the shoulder mark.
For chaplains — the same as for line officers of corresponding rank, but without the star, and stripes to be of lustrous black .mohair braid, instead of gold lace.”
1913 Regulations:

The addition of the ranks of:
Admiral:
“The same as Admiral of the Navy, omitting the outer anchor from under the star.”
Vice Admiral:
“The as above, but substituting a silver foul anchor in place of the gold anchor and surcharged star.”

Admiral Collar devices Line and Staff Corps devices

Service White Coat 1902- Present
The pattern was changed on 1 July 1902, General Order 48.
“Single breasted, button through to neck, with standing collar, form fitting. Unlined. Five buttons. Outside breast pockets only. A dart may be sewn up in breast from gorge to center of breast¬ pocket flap. To be worn with shoulder marks.
Length.—To come about 1 inch below crotch line.
Collar.—Standing collar from 1 to 2 inches high, made of 4 thicknesses of fabric in order to admit of being worn without a linen collar. Fastened in front with heavy white metal hooks and eyes at base and top. Inside the front of collar shall be fitted a small tongue to close back of opening and prevent hooks touching throat.
Pockets.—To have two outside breast pockets, patched on. Pockets to be 5 inches wide by 6 inches deep. Flap to be “shield shaped” 2 inches deep at ends and 2 inches deep at center. Lower corners of flap and pocket slightly rounded. Top of flap on level with second button.
Sleeves and cuffs.—Cuffs closed, without buttons.
Buttons.—Five detachable 35-ligne Navy Standard eagle gilt buttons down right forepart let through eyelet holes. Right facing made open, giving access to back of eyelet holes. Top button inch below collar seam at throat. Bottom button from 9 inches to 10 inches from bottom of blouse, the three others equally spaced between. Pocket flaps to button with 22 -ligne detachable Navy Standard eagle gilt buttons.
Side vents.—There shall be a slit at each hip extending on the right side 5 inches from the bottom of the coat and on the left side as high as the position of the lower edge of the sword belt. These slits to button with medium-size buttons of noncorrosive metal.
Seams.—Turned in and stitched inch wide, no raw edge of material to show inside coat.
Edges.—One-eighth inch wide, single stitched.
Loops.—Two loops on each shoulder for attaching shoulder marks.”

1905 Regulations:
“For all officers the white service coat shall be similar in cut and lit to the blue service coat and shall be made of white linen duck, white bleached cotton twill, or similar material, but without braid for trimming and without fly front, but with slits over the hips, as in the blue service coat; the front to be fitted to button through with five large size gilt navy buttons (for chaplains plain, flat, white buttons instead) the standing collar to be closed in front and fitted with a hook and
eye at base and top, to be from 1 to 2 inches in height and to be of several thicknesses in order to admit of being worn without a linen collar; to have on each breast an outside patch pocket, the top of each to be abreast the second button, dimensions about 4 to 6 inches, without
pleat, lower corners slightly rounded, with a flap at top from 2 ¼ to 2 ½ inches deep, shield shaped, and to button with a small-size gilt navy button; to be fitted on the shoulder for shoulder marks as required. No marks on collar or sleeves, but all commissioned officers and midshipmen shall wear shoulder marks with this coat.
1913 Regulations:
Chaplains could now wear gold buttons.
“…all officers, mates, clerks, and midshipmen shall wear shoulder marks with this coat.”

Sleeve Ornaments
1886 Regulations:
“All staff officers except chaplains shall wear the same lace on the cuff as is prescribed for line officers with whom they have relative rank, with bands of colored cloth around the sleeve, between the strips of gold lace, as follows:
Medical officers, dark maroon velvet.
Pay officers, white cloth.
Engineer officers, red cloth.
Naval constructors, dark violet cloth.
Professors of mathematics, olive green cloth.
Civil engineers, light blue velvet.
Staff officers entitled to but one strip of lace on the sleeve will wear the colored cloth so as to show one-fourth of an inch above and below the strip.
Line officers (including mates, boatswains, and gunners) will wear a star of five rays, embroidered in gold, 1 inch in diameter, on the outer side of each sleeve, and midway between the seams, with one of the rays pointing directly downwards, and the point one-fourth of an inch from the upper edge of the upper strip of lace.”
1897 Regulations:
“For rear admirals.—One strip of 2-inch gold lace, 1½ inches from the edge of the sleeve, with one strip of ½-inch gold lace one-quarter of an inch above it.
Commodores.—One strip of 2-inch gold lace.
Captains.—Four strips of ½-inch gold lace, set one-quarter of an inch apart.
Commanders.—Three strips of ½-inch gold lace, set one-quarter of an inch apart.
Lieutenant commanders.—Two strips of ½-inch, gold lace, with one strip of ¼-inch gold lace between, each one-quarter of an inch apart.
Lieutenants.—Two strips of ½-inch gold lace, one-quarter of an inch apart.
Lieutenants (junior grade).—One strip of ½-inch gold lace, with one strip of ¼-inch gold lace one-quarter of an inch above it.
Ensigns.—One strip of ½-inch gold lace.
Naval cadets who have completed the four years’ course at the Naval Academy.—One strip of ¼-inch gold lace.
In the case of officers below the grade of rear admiral, the lower edge of the sleeve lace shall be 2 inches from the edge of the sleeve.
All staff officers, except chaplains, shall wear the same lace on the cuff as is prescribed for line officers with whom they have
relative rank, with bands of colored cloth around the sleeve, between the strips of gold lace, as follows:
Medical officers, dark maroon velvet.
Pay officers, white cloth.
Engineer officers, red cloth.
Naval constructors, dark-violet cloth.
Professors of mathematics, olive-green cloth.
Civil engineers, light-blue velvet.
Staff officers entitled to but one strip of lace on the sleeve will wear the colored cloth so as to show one-fourth of an inch above and below the strip.
Line officers (including mates, boatswains, and gunners) will wear a star of five rays, embroidered in gold, 1 inch in diameter, on the outer side of each sleeve, and midway between the seams, with one of the rays pointing directly downward, and the point one-fourth of an inch from the upper edge of the upper strip of lace.
Mates, boatswains, and gunners will wear the star 4 inches from the edge of the sleeve.”

The rank of “Admiral of the Navy” was created for George Dewey after the Spanish American War. “The sleeves shall bear stripes of gold lace, the lower edge of the lace to be 2 inches from and parallel to the edge of the sleeve, the number and width of the stripes as follows:
-two stripes of two inch lace, with one stripe of 1 inch lace between, the stripes set ¼ inch apart.”

Staff Corps Devices
1886 Regulations:
“For the medical corps: A spread oak leaf embroidered in dead gold, with an acorn embroidered in silver upon it.
For the pay corps: A silver oak sprig.
For the engineer corps: Four silver oak leaves.
For the construction corps: A gold sprig of two live-oak leaves and an acorn.
For professors: One silver oak leaf and an acorn.
For civil engineers: The (Old English) letters C E in silver.
For secretaries: The (Old English) letter S in silver.”
1897 Regulations:
“For the medical corps.—A spread oak leaf embroidered in dead gold, with an acorn embroidered in silver upon it.
For the pay corps.—A silver oak sprig.
For the engineer corps.—Four silver oak leaves.
For the construction corps.—A gold sprig of two live oak leaves and an acorn.
For professors.—One silver oak leaf and an acorn.
For civil engineers.—The (Old English) letters C. E. in silver.”

NOTE: On 5 January 1900, the Engineer Corps was integrated into the line. Members of the Engineer Corps ceased wearing their four silver ok leaves and began wearing the star of the line on their sleeves and shoulder marks, epaulettes, and the silver fouled anchor on their collars.

Staff corps collar insignias
Embroidered Collar Devices
1886 Regulations:
“Collar devices shall be embroidered in high relief upon each side of the collar of the service coat. They shall be 1 inch in height, with other dimensions proportionate, and shall be placed vertically or horizontally with reference to the upper edge of the collar.”
“The rank device shall commence three-quarters of an inch from the front edge of the collar. The corps device shall be placed three-quarters of an inch in rear of the rear edge of the rank device.
For flag officers the stars shall be placed 1¼ inches between centers with one point up, the center line of the upper point being at right angles to the upper edge of the collar.
Where two bars are worn the distance between them shall be the width of a bar. The bar shall always be placed at right angles to the upper edge of the collar.
The anchor shall be placed with the shank parallel to the upper edge of the collar, and the crown to the front. Devices representing a leaf or a sprig of leaves shall be placed with the axes parallel to the upper edge of the collar, stem to the front, and acorn, if any, on the upper side.”
1897 Regulations:
“Collar devices for the service coat shall be embroidered in high relief upon dark navy-blue cloth. They shall be 1 inch in height, with other dimensions proportionate, and shall be placed vertically or horizontally with reference to the upper edge of the collar.
The rank device shall commence three-quarters of an inch from the front edge of the collar. The corps device shall be placed three-quarters of an inch in rear of the rear edge of the rank device.
For flag officers the stars shall be placed 1¼ inches between centers, with one point up, the center line of the upper point being at right angles to the upper edge of the collar.
Where two bars are worn the distance between them shall be the width of a bar. The bar shall always be placed at right angles to the upper edge of the collar.
The anchor shall be placed with the shank parallel to the upper edge of the collar, and the crown to the front. Devices representing a leaf or a sprig of leaves shall be placed with the axes paral- ¬lel to the upper edge of the collar, stem to the front, and acorn, if any, on the upper side.
Devices shall be as follows:
For rear admirals.—Two silver stars and a silver foul anchor.
For commodores.—One silver star and a silver foul anchor.
For captains.—A silver spread eagle and a silver foul anchor.
For commanders.—A silver oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenant commanders.—A gold oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenants.—Two silver bars and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenants (junior grade).—One silver bar and a silver foul anchor.
For ensigns.—A silver foul anchor.
For naval cadets (line division) who have completed the four years’ course at the Naval Academy.—A gold foul anchor.
Staff officers shall wear the same rank devices as are prescribed for line officers with whom they have relative rank, substituting the proper corps devices for the anchor.
Warrant officers, mates, and pay clerks shall wear the same devices on the collar of their service coat as are prescribed for the frock coat.
1905 Regulations:
“Admiral of the Navy — four silver stars, 1 ¼ inches between centers, one ray pointing upward, with a gold foul anchor under the first and fourth stars, the crowns of the anchors pointing toward each other.
Rear-admiral — two silver stars, 1¼ inches between centers, one ray pointing upward, and a silver foul anchor.
Captain — a silver spread eagle and a silver foul anchor.
Commander- — a silver oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
Lieutenant-commander — a gold oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
Lieutenant — two silver bars and a silver foul anchor; distance between bars to be the width of a bar; all bars at right angles to upper edge of collar,
Lieutenant, junior grade — a silver bar and a silver foul anchor.
Ensign — a silver foul anchor.
Staff officers. — Same as for line officers with whom they rank, but
with the substitution of the proper corps device for the anchor.”
1913 Regulations:
“Devices shall be as follows:
Admiral of the Navy — four silver stars, 1¼ inches between centers,
one ray pointing’ upward, with a gold foul anchor under the first and
fourth stars, the crowns of the anchors pointing toward each other.
For the Admiral: Four silver stars and a gold foul anchor under each of the outer stars.
For the Vice-Admiral: Three silver stars and a silver foul anchor.
For Rear-Admirals: Two silver stars and a silver foul anchor.
For commodores : One silver star and a silver foul anchor.
For captains : A silver spread eagle and a silver foul anchor.
For commanders : A silver oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenant-commanders: A gold oak leaf and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenants : Two silver bars and a silver foul anchor.
For lieutenants, junior grade: One silver bar and a silver foul anchor.
For ensigns : A silver foul anchor.
Staff officers shall wear the same rank devices as are prescribed for line officers with whom they have relative rank, substituting the proper corps devices for the anchor.”

Buttons
1897 Regulations:
“Shall be gilt, convex, and of two sizes in exterior diameter; large, seven-eighths of an inch; and small, nine-sixteenths of an inch. The device shall conform to pattern.”
1905 & 1913 Regulations:
“To be gilt, convex, and of three sizes in exterior diameter: large 7/8 of an inch; medium, 7/10 of an inch; and small, 9/16 of an inch. The device to conform to pattern.”

Three sizes of buttons 1913
Trousers
1886 Regulations:
“Undress and service dress.—For all officers, trousers shall be of dark navy-blue cloth or white linen duck.
During hot weather dark navy-blue flannel trousers will be permitted in service dress.”
1897 Regulations:
“Undress and service dress.—For all officers, trousers shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, white linen duck, or cotton twill. Dark navy-blue serge trousers will be permitted with service dress.”

Caps
1886 Regulations:
“The cap for all officers shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top to be slightly less than at the base, the quarters not less than 1¼ or more than 1½ inches high, and of the same height in front and at the back. The seam around the top shall be made without a welt, and neatly stitched on each side. The band shall be 1½ inches wide with a welt one-eighth of an inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom welt shall be one-eighth of an inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the service coat, shall be worn between upper and lower welts. The visor for all officers shall be of black patent leather, molded to shape and bound with the same. All visors shall be green underneath, rounded and sloping downwards not less than 20° or more than 30° from the horizontal. The inside band shall be of leather, and shall extend from the base of the cap to within 1 inch of the top. The sweat lining shall be of morocco. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band in the quarters for ventilation. A small sized navy button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt. For all commissioned officers, a sliding chin-strap of leather, faced with half inch gold lace, with two gold-lace slides of the same width, shall be fastened
over the buttons; for all other officers a similar chin-strap one quarter of an inch in width. When not used under the chin, the strap will be drawn between the buttons, resting on the upper edge of the visor.”
1897 Regulations:
“The cap for all officers shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top to be one-half inch greater than that at the base, the quarters not less than 1¼ nor more than 1½ inches high, and of the same height in front and at the back. The seam around the top shall be made without a welt, and neatly stitched on each side.
The band shall be 1½ inches wide with a welt one-eighth of an inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom welt shall be one-eighth of an inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the service coat, shall be worn between upper and lower welts. The visors shall be of black patent leather, molded to shape and bound with the same. Those for rear admirals, commodores, captains, commanders, and officers of corresponding relative rank, shall be covered with blue cloth and embroidered as follows: Rear admirals and commodores, embroidered all around with oak leaves; staff officers of corresponding relative rank, a gold band, one-half inch wide, embroidered all around the edge; captains and commanders, embroidered along the front edge with oak leaves; staff officers of corresponding relative rank, a gold band, one-half inch wide, embroidered along front edge. All visors shall be green underneath, rounded and sloping downward not less than 20° nor more than 30° from the horizontal. The inside band shall be of leather, and shall extend from the base of the cap to within 1 inch of the top. The sweat lining shall be of morocco. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band in the quarters for ventilation. A small-sized navy button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt. For all commissioned officers and naval cadets, a sliding chin strap of leather, faced with half-inch gold lace, with two gold-lace slides of the same width, shall be fastened over the buttons; for all other officers a similar chin strap one-quarter of an inch in width. When not used under the chin, the strap will be drawn between the buttons, resting on the upper edge of the visor.”

1905 Regulations:
“The cap to be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top to be ½ inch greater than that at the base, the quarters not less than 1 ¼ nor more than l 1/8 inches high, and of the same height in front and at the back. The seam around the top shall be made without a welt, and neatly stitched on each side. The band shall be 1 ½ inches wide with a welt 1/8 of an inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom welt shall be 1/8 inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the service coat, shall be worn between upper and lower welt, the upper edge of mohair band being left unsewn to admit of bottom edge of white cover to be slipped under when required. The visor shall be of black patent leather, molded to shape and bound with the same; shall be green underneath, rounded and sloping downward not less than 20 degrees nor more than 30 degrees from the horizontal. The inside band shall be of leather, and shall extend from the base of the cap to within 1 inch of the top. The sweat lining shall be of morocco. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band, in the quarters, for ventilation. A small-sized navy button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt.
The cap device for commissioned officers to be a silver shield, emblazoned paleways of 13 pieces, with a chief strewn with stars, surmounted by a silver spread-eagle, the whole placed upon two crossed foul anchors in gold. To be embroidered on stiffened dark-blue cloth
in high relief. Attached to front of cap with center over upper welt, upper half loose, to admit white cover.
The chin strap for all commissioned officers, except chaplains, and for midshipmen, to be a sliding strap of leather, faced with ¼ -inch gold lace, with two gold lace slides of the same width. To be fastened over the buttons. When not used under the chin, to be drawn between the buttons, resting on the upper edge of the visor. For chaplains, the same as above, but to be of lustrous black mohair.
Visor ornaments: For the Admiral of the Navy and rear-admirals, sprays of oak leaves with acorns, embroidered in gold on blue cloth. For staff officers of the rank of rear-admiral, gold bands, ½ inch wide, embroidered on blue cloth. For captains and commanders, sprays of oak leaves and acorns embroidered in gold on blue cloth along the front edge of the visor. For staff officers of the rank of captain or commander, except chaplains, a gold band, ½ inch wide, embroidered on blue cloth along the front edge of the visor. For chaplains, the same as for other staff officers of equal rank, except that the band is to be of lustrous black mohair.
For other officers, the visor to be plain.”
1913 Regulations:
The cap shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, the diameter at the top being from 1¼ to 1½ inches greater than that at the base, the quarters to measure not less than 1 3/8 nor more than 1 5/8 inches slant-height, the same height in front and at the back. The seam around the top shall be
made without a welt, and neatly stitched on each side. The crown andquarters to be stiffened, so as to hold its shape, using a grommet ofwhalebone, bamboo, or other nonmetallic material. The band shall be 1½ inches wide with a welt1/8 inch in diameter at the top and bottom. The bottom welt shall be 1/8 inch from the base of the cap. A band of lustrous black mohair braid, similar to that used for the trimmings of the service coat, shall be worn between the upper and lower welt. The visor shall be of black patent leather, molded to shape, and bound with the same, green underneath, rounded and sloping downward not less than 30 degrees nor more than 40 degrees from the horizontal. The inside band shall be of leather and extend from the base of the cap to within 1 inch of the top; sweat lining of morocco. Four black metal eyelets, two on each side, shall be placed above the band, in the quarters for ventilation. A small-sized Navy button shall be placed on each side beyond the ends of the visor, the eye of the button immediately above the lower welt.
The cap device for commissioned officers shall be a silver shield, emblazoned paleways of 13 pieces, with a chief strewn with stars, surmounted by a silver spread-eagle, the whole place upon two crossed foul anchors in gold. It shall be embroidered on stiffened dark-blue cloth
in high relief shall be attached to the front of the cap with the center over the upper welt. For warrant officers, mates, and paymaster’s clerks, the device shall be two gold foul anchors
crossed, mounted as above. The chin strap for all commissioned officers except chaplains shall be a sliding strap of leather, faced with ½-inch gold lace, with two gold lace slides of the same width, the strap to be fastened over the buttons. When not used under the chin, the strap shall be drawn taut between the buttons, resting on the upper edge of the visor. For chaplains the strap shall be the same as the above, but made of lustrous black mohair instead of leather and gold lace.
Visor ornaments:
For the Admiral of the Navy and all other flag officers, and commodores, the visor ornaments shall be sprays of oak leaves with acorns embroidered in gold on blue cloth.) For staff officers of the corresponding rank they shall be gold bands ½ inch in width, embroidered on blue cloth, as shown in Fig. 6. For captains and commanders, they shall be sprays of oak leaves and acorns embroidered in gold on blue cloth along the front edge of the visor.
For chaplains For chaplains they shall be the same as for other staff officers of equal rank, except that the band shall be of lustrous black mohair. For all other officers the visor shall be plain.

Cap Ornament
1886 Regulations:
“The ornament shall be embroidered on dark blue cloth in high relief, and attached to the front of the cap, with its center over the upper welt.
For all commissioned officers and naval cadets who have completed the four years’ course at the Naval Academy, the device shall be a silver shield, emblazoned paleways, of thirteen pieces, with a chief strewn with stars surmounted by a silver spread-eagle, the whole being placed upon two crossed foul anchors embroidered in gold.”

Ornament on blue cap. Device mounted on white cap cover.
Cap Device
1897 Regulations:
“The device shall be embroidered on dark-blue cloth in high relief, and attached to the front of the cap, with its center over the upper welt.
For all commissioned officers and naval cadets who have completed the four years’ course at the Naval Academy, the device shall be a silver shield, emblazoned paleways, of thirteen pieces, with a chief strewn with stars surmounted by a silver spread eagle, the whole being placed upon two crossed foul anchors embroidered in gold.
All caps shall strictly conform to the standard sample that has been approved by the Department.”

Cap Cover
1897 Regulations:
“White cap covers shall be made of linen and secured on either side to the cap buttons. The chin strap shall be worn on the outside of the white cap cover. It may be worn over the blue cap or stretched on a skeleton frame.”

White Cap
1905 Regulations:
“For all officers the white cap shall present the same appearance as the blue cap, except that the top shall be white above the black mohair band. Either the blue cap, with a cover made of white linen duck or similar material, fitted closely over the top and behind the device and mohair band, to be worn, or a skeleton cap, with device, mohair band, visor, and visor ornaments the same as on the blue cap, but the top and quarters of the cap made of white linen duck or similar
material.”
1913 Regulations:
The white cap shall present the same shape and appearance as the blue cap, except that the top shall be white above the black mohair band. It shall be a skeleton cap, with device, mohair band, chin strap, buttons, visor, and visor ornaments the same as on the blue cap, but with the quarters of the cap made of light, stiff material, with a grommet of whalebone, bamboo, or other nonmetallic material, the whole covered with a removable, snug fitting cover of white linen duck or similar material.

Shirts
1905 Regulations
“Only plain-bosomed white shirts shall be permitted with those coats which are worn open, and in all cases no part of shirt not white shall be permitted to show.“

Collars and Cuffs
1905 Regulations:
Plain white collars and plain white cuffs to be worn with all uniforms, except in such weather or under such circumstances as the senior officer present shall permit their abandonment with service dress; plain standing collars to be worn with the special full dress and the service coats.

Boots and Shoes
1886 Regulations:
“Shall be of black calf-skin or patent leather. At social entertainments low shoes and black socks will be permitted.
In warm weather, low shoes with white or black socks may be worn, in undress and service dress. When leggings are worn they shall be the same as those worn by enlisted men.”
1897 Regulations:
“Shoes, high or low, shall be of calfskin or patent leather. In warm weather, with white trousers, plain white shoes of canvas or buckskin may be permitted by the senior officer present, when service dress is worn.”
1905 Regulations:
“Shoes, high or low, shall be of black calfskin or patent leather, but with white trousers plain white shoes of canvas or buckskin shall be worn, except with ”dress'” uniform.”
1913 Regulations:
Shoes, high and low, to be of black calfskin, patent leather, or enamel leather, white canvas, or buckskin. With white shoes, rubber soles and spring heels are permitted. Black shoes shall be worn with special full dress, full dress, evening, and dinner dress. White shoes shall be worn with white trousers, except in “Dress” uniform, or with a landing force, or with leggings. Pumps may be worn mess dress, evening, or dinner dress.”

Sword
1886 & 1897 & 1905 Regulations:
“The sword for all officers shall be a cut and-thrust blade, not less than 26 nor more than 32 inches long; half-basket hilt; grip white; scabbards of black leather; mountings of yellow gilt; and all as per pattern.”

Sword Belt (Service Dress)
1886 Regulations:
“For all officers, the belt shall be of plain black grained leather, not less than 1⅝-inch nor more than 2 inches wide, with sling-straps of the same, not less than one-half nor more than three-quarters of an inch wide, and with a hook in the forward ring to suspend the sword. The belt-plate shall be of yellow gilt in front, 2 inches in diameter. The sword belt shall be worn over the special full-dress and frock coats, with the lower edge of the belt placed above the two lower buttons in front and the two at the waist behind. The short-sling clasp shall be immediately in rear of the left hip bone; the long-sling clasp exactly in the center of the back between the buttons.
With the full dress and service coats and the overcoat, the belt is to be worn underneath.
When an officer is in uniform, the sword shall always be carried attached to the slings, and with the belt properly adjusted on the body.
When the sword is hooked up it shall be with a half turn, so that the hilt shall be to the rear of the hook; the back of the blade turned to the front, sling-straps outside.”
1897 Regulations
“For all officers, the belt shall be of plain black grained leather, not less than 1 5/8 inch nor more than 2 inches wide, with sling straps of the same, not less than one-half nor more than three-quarters of an inch wide, and with a hook in the forward ring to suspend the sword. The belt plate shall be of yellow gilt in front, 2 inches in diameter. The sword belt shall be worn over the
special full-dress and frock coats, with the lower edge of the belt placed above the two lower buttons in front and the two at the waist behind. The short sling clasp shall be immediately in rear of the left hip bone; the long sling clasp exactly in the center of the back between the buttons.
With the service and evening-dress coats and the overcoat, the belt is to be worn underneath.
When an officer is in uniform, the sword shall always be carried attached to the slings, and with the belt properly adjusted on the body.
When the sword is hooked up it shall be with a half turn, so that the hilt shall be to the rear of the hook; the back of the blade turned to the front, sling straps outside. The sword is to be worn outside the overcoat, the long sling of the belt passing through the rear slit, and the short sling through the side slit of the coat.”
1905 Regulations:
“To be of plain Mack grain leather, not less than 1 5/8 inches nor more than 2 inches wide, with sling straps of the same, not less than i inch nor more than f inch wide, and attached to the belt as shown for the full dress belt, mountings of belt the same as for the full dress belt, except the sling straps to have no buckles. The belt plate or buckle to be of yellow gilt in front, 2 inches in diameter, conforming to pattern.”

Service Dress sword belt 1905

Sword Knot
1886 & 1897 & 1905 Regulations:
“For all officers, except boatswains, gunners, carpenters, sailmakers, mates, and clerks, the sword-knot shall be a strap of half-inch gold lace 24 inches long, including the tassel, with a gold slide, tassel of twelve gold bullions, 1¾ inches long, inclosing five blue bullions, and with basket-worked head.”

Sword Knot.
Gloves
1886 Regulations:
“Shall be of white lisle thread, except for open air service in cold weather, when white leather or heavy white cotton shall be worn.”
1897 & 1905 Regulations:
“Gloves shall be of white lisle thread, except for open-air service in cold weather, when white leather or heavy white cotton or woolen gloves may be worn.”
cuffs is optional, unless prescribed for occasions. The senior officer
present may permit their abandonment also with service dress. Turnover
collars or those having flaps, lapels, etc., shall not be worn with any
uniform.
1913 Regulations:
White gloves to be of white lisle thread, or of white kid with white stitching. White kid gloves may be worn with evening full dress or dress, dinner dress, special full dress, or full dress. White gloves of buckskin or dogskin or heavy white cotton or woolen may be worn in cold weather.
With service dress, with or without overcoats, service gloves of iron grey buckskin, dogskin, or woolen shall be worn, of the pattern prescribed by the Bureau of Navigation and furnished by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts. At sea, and during night watches in port, gauntlet gloves of the same color may be worn by officers on duty.
Overcoat
1897 Regulations:
“For all officers, the overcoat shall be an ulster, of dark navy blue cloth (smooth-faced), lined with dark-blue or black material, the bottom of the skirt 9 to 12 inches from the ground, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar of the same material as the coat, and broad enough to protect the ears when turned up; seven plain, flat black buttons on each front, 1¼ inches in diameter, the lower buttons to be placed as low as the knee, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat; an outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be up and down, and the lower part of the opening to be level with the elbow; an up-and-down slit over the left hip long enough to allow the short sling of the sword belt to pass through it and the sword to be hooked up (about 4 inches); slit to be strengthened on inside by suitable material.
Overcoats shall be made full in the back and fitted with two straps let into the side seams in the back above the hips; the right strap shall have two small buttons of the overcoat pattern, about two inches apart, and the left strap two corresponding buttonholes the same distance apart. No collar devices. The grade mark on the sleeve shall be of lustrous black braid of double thickness, showing the same width and disposition as that of gold lace worn on the other coats. The corps distinction on the sleeve shall be omitted.
A hood of the same material as the coat, made to button around the neck under the collar, and large enough to cover the head and cap, shall be worn attached to the coat in extremely cold weather, or when prescribed by the senior officer present.
Commissioned officers shall wear shoulder straps with the overcoat. The overcoat shall be worn entirely buttoned.”
1905 Regulations
“The overcoat shall be an ulster, of dark navy-blue cloth (smooth faced), lined with dark-blue or black material, the bottom of the skirt 9 to 12 inches from the ground, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar of the same material as the coat, and so broad
that when turned up it will protect the ears; seven plain, flat black buttons on each front, 1 inches in diameter, the lower buttons to be placed as low as the knee, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat; an outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be up and down, and
the lower part of the opening to be level with the elbow; an up-and-down slit over the left hip long enough to allow the short sling of the sword belt to pass through it and the sword to be hooked up (about 4 inches); slit to be strengthened on inside by suitable material. All
seams to be plain.”
Overcoats shall be made full in the back and fitted with two straps let into the side seams in the back above the hips; the right .strap shall have two small buttons of the overcoat pattern, about 2 inches apart, and the left strap two corresponding buttonholes the same distance
apart. The rear slit of the overcoat shall extend not more than 25 inches nor less than 20 inches from the bottom of the garment, and with the right flap on the outside.
A hood of the same material as the coat, made to button around the neck under the collar, and large enough to cover the head and cap, may be worn attached to the coat in extremely cold weather, or when prescribed by the senior officer present.
Sleeve marks, to indicate rank only, to consist of stripes of lustrous black braid, of the same number, width, and disposition as the gold lace stripes on the sleeves of the service coat.
Shoulder marks to be worn on the overcoat, except by warrant officers, mates, and clerks.”

Overcoat, circa 1917 Cloak and Overcoat
Cloak
1897 Regulations:
“The cloak is to be cut three-fourths of a circle, of a length to reach to the ends of the fingers when the arms are hanging naturally by the side, and is to be made of the material and lining prescribed for overcoats.”
1905 Regulations:
“The cloak is to be cut three-fourths of a circle, of a length to reach to the ends of the fingers when the arms are hanging naturally by the .side, to be made of the material and lining prescribed for overcoats, with a rolling collar of the same material as the cloak, from 3 inches
to 4 inches wide; to be fastened at the neck by a T hook and eye, and to have one frog laid on, conforming to pattern.”

Dungarees
25 January 1913
Dungarees officially authorised for officers.

Mackintosh
1897 Regulations:
“The mackintosh is to be of black or dark navy-blue material, bottom of the skirt to reach to within 9 to 12 inches from the ground, to be fitted with a cape reaching to the waist, to be without sleeves, and with the shoulders cut to admit of wearing epaulets or shoulder knots.”

1897 General Regulations
1. All persons belonging to the Navy must strictly conform to such regulations for uniform as may be published from time to time by the Navy Department. Every person belonging to the Navy is strictly forbidden to wear any dress or decoration, other than that to which his grade or the law entitles him.
2. Officers on duty on board all ships of war of the United States and on board all receiving ships, Coast Survey vessels, and vessels of the Fish Commission, and at all navy-yards and shore stations will at all times wear the uniform of their respective grades.
3. Officers are permitted to wear plain clothes when on duty at the Navy Department, Naval Observatory, Naval Proving Ground, Coast Survey Office, and under the Light-House Board.
4. Officers serving on courts-martial, courts of inquiry, boards of examination, or when attending as witnesses or otherwise before courts-martial or courts of inquiry, shall wear the prescribed Undress A uniform of their respective grades.
5. Officers on leave from their ships or shore stations are permitted to wear plain clothes at the discretion of the senior officer present.
6. Retired officers will be permitted to wear the uniform of their grade as prescribed at the time of their retirement.
7. Officers are prohibited from wearing their uniforms while suspended from duty by sentence of a court-martial or on furlough for punishment.
8. On all occasions of ceremony, when a commanding officer may deem it necessary to order the attendance of the officers under his command, he will prescribe the uniform to be worn.
9. Officers are forbidden to wear any part of the naval uniform with plain clothes, except the overcoat, cape, or mackintosh.
10. Immediately after a vessel is commissioned, and before proceeding to sea, the commanding officer shall ascertain and report to the Department whether any officer under his command is unprovided with his complete naval uniform and equipment.
11. In orders prescribing the uniform to be worn, the designations (1) special full dress, (2) full dress, (3) dress, (4) undress A, (5) undress B, (6) service dress, (7) evening dress A, and (8) evening dress B shall be used.
If white service coats, white trousers, or white cap covers are to be worn, the fact shall be stated; otherwise it will be understood that the dress is to be all blue.
In cold weather the senior officer present may order overcoats to be worn over any of the foregoing uniforms. When overcoats are worn, epaulets shall be dispensed with.
In foul weather, except under special circumstances, officers shall be permitted to wear rain clothes.

1905 General Regulations
“119. No decoration received from a foreign government shall be publicly shown or exposed upon the person of any officer.
200. (1) The distinctive medals and badges adopted by societies of men who have served in the armies and navies of the United States in the war of the Revolution, the war of 1812, the Mexican war, the war of the rebellion, the Spanish-American war and the incident insurrection in the Philippines, and the Chinese relief expedition of 1900, may be worn upon all occasions of ceremony by officers and men of the Army and Navy of the United States who are members of
said organizations in their own right.
(2) Medals presented by the Government of the United States to officers and enlisted men of the Navy shall be worn on occasions of ceremony, as prescribed in the regulations for uniforms.
(B) The distinctive badge adopted by the Army and Navy Union of the United States of America may be worn upon all public occasions of ceremony by officers and enlisted men of the Army and Navy of the United States who are members of said organizations in their own right.
(4) The metal badge of the Naval Temperance League may be worn by members of the league on occasions of general muster and ceremony, or when going ashore on liberty.
(5) Persons who, by right of inheritance and election, are members of any of the military societies referred to in paragraphs 1 and B of this article, are members thereof in their own right.
201. Officers may dispense with wearing uniform when on duty at the Navy Department, Naval Observatory, under the Light-House Board, in the Coast Survey Office, and when employed on shore duty other than at navy yards and shore stations.
202. (1) On all occasions of ceremony or duty and on social occasions when officers attend in an official capacity, uniforms shall be worn.
(2) Chiefs of bureaus shall wear the uniform of rear-admiral upon all .occasions on which uniform is worn, the chiefs of staff bureaus wearing the cap, shoulder, and sleeve ornaments of their respective corps, but of the grade of rear-admiral.
203. Retired officers ordered to duty shall not be required to have any other uniform than service dress.
204. In foreign ports on occasions of all reviews, public balls, entertainments given by naval or military authorities or messes, or by civil officials, and during all visits of ceremony, officers who attend from ships lying in the port shall appear in uniform.
205. On board vessels other than those of the fourth rate, mess dress or evening dress-B shall be worn at dinner in the messes of commissioned and junior officers; except when the commanding officer shall substitute the uniform of the day, on account of bad weather at sea. coaling ship, or other special circumstances. All the members of any one mess shall appear in the same dress. After dinner, officers not on duty may appear on deck in the dress worn at mess.
200. Undress uniform, without side arms and with gloves, shall be worn by all officers on the upper decks or in sight, when going in or out of port, unless overcoats, rain coats, or white service dress are prescribed.
207. During divine service chaplains may wear the vestments of the church to which they belong.
208. Swords shall always be worn at quarters and upon leaving a ship, navy yard, or station on military duty. When attending funerals the hilt shall be draped with black crape.
209. The senior officer shall regulate daily the uniform for officers and men. He shall also prescribe the dress to be worn on all occasions mentioned in articles 202 and 204 and at such other times as he may deem proper.
210. Plain clothes may be worn by officers as provided for in the uniform regulations. When in foreign ports discretion must be observed in granting this privilege.
211. No member of the crew shall at any time, either on board ship or on shore, wear any dress but his prescribed uniform. Particular attention shall be paid that none but uniform underclothing is worn by the crew.
212. Enlisted men of the Navy who have received medals of honor, life-saving medals, good-conduct medals, or any other medals presented by the Government of tin 1 United States, shall wear them at general muster, Sunday inspection, and other occasions of dress ceremony.
528. He “shall see that officers commanding divisions * * * keep correct clothing lists and make out necessary requisitions; that the issue of clothing and small stores is made by divisions; and that all issues are witnessed bv an officer, an officer in each division to witness the issue to his division, if practicable; that officers are careful in their inspections of their divisions, their clothing and bedding. * * *
552. He” shall prepare a dress board on which will be indicated the uniform of the crew, and place it in a conspicuous position.
642. (1) They shall, in addition to carrying out the instructions already laid down for inspection, take special care that all outer and under clothing, overcoats, caps.’ hats, and bedding of the men are, in respect to quality, pattern, and color, in accordance with the prescribed uniform.
(2) They 6 shall see that all materials drawn are used for the purpose required; and that all clothing is neatly made, marked, and kept in order, and that none of it is sold; that the men are neat in person and clothing, and provided with regulation knives and lanyards; and that
Under clothing is worn at all times unless dispensed with by order of the captain. All work done by the ship’s tailor shall be submitted to the division officer for inspection and approval before it is accepted or any payment made therefor.
820. The members of the crew must, on all occasions, * * * lie neat in their persons and dress; and each should endeavor by his own good conduct, respectful bearing, and zeal to promote efficiency of the entire command.
821. The use of .sheath knives on board ship by the crew is forbidden. Every man of the seaman branch shall carry a jackknife attached to a lanyard.
824. * * * (2) Whenever recruits are received on board receiving ships, they shall be required at once to have their hair cut. bathe, and report for physical examination. Upon the completion of the examination, should the recruits qualify, commanding officers shall have the outfit of clothing issued to each and carefully marked. Commanding officers shall not allow recruits to keep on board any article of clothing not authorized by regulations, except such underclothing as may be worn at the time of enlistment and is in good condition. All other citizens’ clothing must be disposed of as the recruit may desire.
(3) “He” shall not allow clothing or small stores to be issued to recruits without his written order.
911). ” J * * (2) The captain may forbid the wearing of medals by any person undergoing punishment.
1750. (L) An officer holding an acting appointment shall wear the uniform of the grade to which he is appointed, and shall affix the title of his acting rank to his official signature; when such duty ceases, he shall resume the uniform and title of his actual rank.
(2) A commander in chief may issue an order to any officer to assume the rank and uniform of a grade to which he has been promoted, upon receiving satisfactory evidence of such promotion.

“He” referenced above may be construed as The executive officer, The division officers, The captain.

All persons belonging to the Navy must strictly conform to such regulations for uniforms as may be published from time to time by the Navy Department. Every person belonging to the Navy is strictly forbidden to wear any dress or decoration other than that to which his grade or the law entitles him.
2. Officers on duty on board all ships of war of the United States and on board all receiving ships, Coast Survey vessels, and vessels of the Bureau of Fisheries, and at all navy yards and shore stations, will at all times wear the uniform of their respective grades.
3. On all occasions of ceremony, when a commanding officer may deem it necessary to order the attendance of officers under his command, he shall prescribe the uniform to be worn.
4. (a) In orders prescribing the uniform to be worn, the designations (1) special full dress, (2) full dress. (3) dress, (4) undress-A, (5) undress- B, (6) service dress, (7) evening dress-A, (8) evening dress-B, (9) mess dress, and (10) uniform C, shall be used. (See section 2.)
(b) Officers of the Navy and Marine Corps visiting the White House on occasions of ceremony shall wear uniform as follows:
When “Uniform A” is designated — Navy, special full dress.
Marine Corps, special full dress.
When “Uniform B” is designated — Navy, service dress with side arms.
Marine Corps, undress.
When “Uniform C” is designated — Navy, evening dress-A, with white waistcoat.
Marine Corps, special full dress.
(c) If white service coats, white trousers, white waistcoats, white helmets, or white caps are to be worn, the fact shall be stated; otherwise, it will be understood that the dress is to be all blue. Whenever white trousers are worn (except in “dress” uniform), white caps or helmets shall be prescribed. Overcoats may be ordered by the senior officer present in cold weather, to be worn over any of the foregoing uniforms. When overcoats are worn, epaulets shall be dispensed with.
In foul weather, officers shall be permitted to wear rain clothes, except under special circumstances.
5. Medals awarded to officers by the Government shall be worn with special full dress, full dress, dress, evening dress-A, and “”uniform C on the left breast, to the left of and on a horizontal line between the second and third buttons of the special full dress and the frock coats and in a similar position on the evening dress coat. Other medals and badges authorized by the Navy Regulations may also be worn with these uniforms. Medals awarded by the Government shall be worn in place in the order of occurrence of the occasions which they respectively commemorate, counting from right to left.
6. Immediately after a vessel is commissioned and before proceeding to sea, the commanding officer shall ascertain and report to the Department whether any officer under his command is unprovided with his complete outfit of naval uniform and equipment.
7. Officers serving on torpedo vessels shall not be required to wear other than service dress.
8. The officer of the deck in port shall wear gloves and carry a binocular or spyglass. At sea he shall carry a deck trumpet.
9. The cloak or mackintosh may be worn in inclement weather as a protection to epaulets and shoulder knots, except at drills and exercises.
10. Officers on duty with enlisted men under arms on shore shall wear service dress, except on occasions of special ceremony, when special full dress or full dress is prescribed for other officers present, in which case the officers on duty with enlisted men shall wear
“Undress- A,” with leggings if prescribed.
11. Officers on leave from their ships or shore stations are permitted to wear plain clothes, at the discretion of the senior officer present.
L2. Officers are forbidden to wear any part of the naval uniform with plain clothes, except the overcoat, with shoulder marks removed, the cloak, or mackintosh.
13. Retired officers will be permitted to wear the uniform of their grade as prescribed at the time of their retirement.
11. Officers suspended from duty b} 7 sentence of a court-martial or on furlough for punishment are prohibited from wearing their uniforms during the period of such punishment.
15. Sword belts shall be worn outside special full-dress and frock coats, inside overcoats and service dress coats, and underneath the evening dress waistcoat.
16. The sword shall be habitually worn hooked up, guard to the rear, slings outside; with the overcoat it shall be worn outside, the long sling of the belt passing through the rear slit and the short sling through the side slit of the overcoat. The sword knot shall always be worn with the sword, by officers for whom it is prescribed.
17. When on duty with naval brigade or landing party, leggings are to be worn, and such arms, equipments, and extra clothing as the nature, of the service may require.
The haversack is worn in rear of loft hip; canteen in rear of right hip, with cartridge or sword belt over both haversack sling’s and the rear sling- of the canteen.
If officers carry the revolver, the sword belt is worn outside the service coat or overcoat, the carl ridge box in front, and to the right of the belt buckle. The revolver is worn slightly in rear of the right hip. The canteen is carried on the right side in rear of the revolver, with its rear sling under the sword belt.
18. White gloves shall always be worn with the sword, except at sea or in exercises as infantry other than dress parade. The senior officer present may prescribe white gloves at any time.
19. Acting assistant surgeons appointed for three years 1 service in the Navy shall be required to provide themselves with the articles of uniform prescribed for service dress, blue and white, only.

When on duty with naval brigade or landing party, leggings are to be worn, and such arms, equipments, and extra clothing as the nature, of the service may require.
The haversack is worn in rear of loft hip; canteen in rear of right hip, with cartridge or sword belt over both haversack sling’s and the rear sling- of the canteen.
If officers carry the revolver, the sword belt is worn outside the service coat or overcoat, the cartridge box in front, and to the right of the belt buckle. The revolver is worn slightly in rear of the right hip. The canteen is carried on the right side in rear of the revolver, with its rear sling under the sword belt.

White gloves shall always be worn with the sword, except at sea or in exercises as infantry other than dress parade. The senior officer present may prescribe white gloves at any time.
Acting assistant surgeons appointed for three years 1 service in the Navy shall be required to provide themselves with the articles of uniform prescribed for service dress, blue and white, only.”

1913 General Regulations
1. Officers in authority shall assure themselves that all officers and enlisted men serving under them conform strictly to these uniform regulations. Particular attention is directed to the questions concerning uniform required to be answered in making out reports on the fitness of
officers.
2. Officers shall set an example of neatness and strict conformity to regulations in uniforms and equipment. Enlisted men must be neat and trim in their persons and dress on all occasions.
3. Every person belonging to the Navy or Marine Corps is strictly forbidden to wear any dress or decoration other than that to which his grade or the law entitles him. No decorations received from a foreign Government, nor any other decoration or badge not specifically prescribed or authorized by these regulations, shall be worn exposed by any officer or enlisted man.
4. Officers and enlisted men on duty shall at all times wear the uniform of their respective grades, as prescribed herein or by the senior officer present, except as otherwise provided herein.
5. Officers serving in torpedo vessels and submarines shall not be required to wear other than service dress, except when they attend social or especially ceremonious occasions in their official capacity or visit foreign or civil officials. Crews of torpedo vessels and submarines shall
wear the same uniforms as prescribed for other vessels, except as provided in article 51.
6. a. Officers serving under acting commissions in time of war or for other special purposes, acting assistant surgeons appointed for three years’ service in the Navy, and acting assistant dental surgeons are required to provide themselves only with the articles of uniform prescribed for service dress and white service dress.
6. b. Naval Medical Reserve officers ordered to active duty shall be required to provide themselves only with the articles of uniform prescribed for undress, service dress, and white service dress.
7. Chiefs of bureaus of the Navy Department, upon occasions when uniform is worn, shall wear uniforms bearing the equipments and rank insignia denoting the rank of rear admiral and the distinctive devices of the corps to which they respectively belong.
8. An officer holding an acting appointment shall wear the uniform of the grade to which he is appointed until such appointment be revoked, when he shall resume the uniform and title of his actual rank.
9. An officer promoted may be authorized or ordered by a commander in chief or other officer in chief command afloat or at a shore station, or the commanding officer of a vessel acting singly, if satisfied that the promotion has been made, to assume the rank and uniform of the grade to which he has been promoted.
10. During divine service a chaplain may wear the vestments of the church to which he belongs.
11. Officers on the retired list on active duty shall conform to these regulations the same in all respects as officers on the active list; if not on duty, they are not required to wear or have uniform, but they may wear uniform in conformity with these regulations, except that in pattern their uniforms and equipments may be either as prescribed herein or as at the time of their retirement.
12. Officers suspended from duty by sentence of a court-martial, or on furlough or waiting orders for punishment, are prohibited from wearing uniform during the period of punishment.
13. When on duty, or when ashore in a foreign port, enlisted men of the Navy or Marine Corps, whether serving afloat or ashore, shall not wear any dress but their prescribed uniforms. Non regulation outer or under clothing shall not be worn nor kept in the possession of enlisted
men on board ship or within the limits of a shore station.
14. Parts of one uniform shall not be worn with parts of another, except as specified in these regulations.
15. Civilian’s clothing may be permitted to be worn by officers and enlisted men as provided in the following paragraphs, but discretion must be observed in granting this privilege in foreign ports:
(a) Officers may be authorized to wear civilian’s clothing when on duty at the Navy Department, Naval Observatory, or Marine Corps headquarters, or when employed on shore duty without troops other than at navy yards, shore stations, and recruiting offices.
(b) Officers on leave of absence from their places of duty, or having permission to leave the ship or station, may wear civilian’s clothing, at the discretion of the senior officer present.
(c) Enlisted men may be permitted to wear civilian’s clothing when on leave of absence or liberty in a home port, but they shall not be allowed to have civilian’s clothing in their possession on board ship and must leave and return to the ship in uniform.
16. With civilian’s clothing, officers of the Navy shall not wear any part of the uniform except the overcoat, cloak, or mackintosh. Officers of the Marine Corps shall not wear any part of the uniform with civilian’s clothing except the raincoat or cape. Enlisted men of the Navy shall not
wear any part of the uniform with civilian’s clothing except the overcoat, jersey, underclothing, and shoes; enlisted men of the Marine Corps, none except underclothing and shoes.
17. The uniform for officers and men for the day or for any particular occasion shall be fixed by the senior officer present, with due regard to the duty to be performed and the state of the weather and, as far as maybe practicable, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 2 of these
regulations. In any special case not definitely covered by Chapter 2, the senior officer present shall be guided in assigning the uniform by the general principles laid down in that chapter. As far as practicable, the officers and men shall wear corresponding uniforms. As a matter of
routine, the uniform at posts and barracks of the Marine Corps shall be prescribed by the commanding officer.
18. In the fleet, the uniform of the day prescribed by the senior officer present shall be worn by officers of the watch; by all petty officers, signalmen, and others on watch above decks, and by running boats’, steamers’, and power boats’ crews; by all persons above deck at “all hands” when going in or out of port; and generally by all officers and men above decks and in common living spaces; but commanding officers may prescribe or permit working dress for other persons, as may be most suitable to the exercise or duty of the ship at the time.
19. On all occasions of ceremony or duty, and on social occasions when officers attend in an official capacity, uniform shall be worn.
20. On board saluting ships, mess dress or evening dress shall be worn at dinner, when not at sea, in the messes of commissioned officers. All the members of any one mess shall appear in the same dress. After dinner officers not on duty may appear on deck in the dress worn at mess or in service dress, blue or white. The commanding officer may substitute the uniform of the day to be worn at dinner, on account of coaling ship or other special circumstances, including those under which adequate laundry facilities are lacking.
21. Officers on duty with enlisted men under arms on shore shall ordinarily wear service dress (undress or field dress for officers of the Marine Corps). On occasions of special ceremony, when special full dress or full dress is prescribed for other officers present, officers of the Navy on duty with enlisted men shall wear undress, with leggings, and officers of the Marine Corps shall wear such uniform as may be prescribed for them.
22. Leggings shall always be worn by officers and enlisted men of the Navy when on duty in the field or with a naval brigade or landing party, but never by naval or marine officers in special full dress or full dress.Marines shall not wear leggings at ordinary drills under arms, unless specified, but when marines form part of a mixed landing force, leggings for marines shall be expressly specified, if the rest wear them.
23. Leggings shall always be worn by enlisted men of the Navy with any form of dress, when under arms for parade or ceremony, or infantry or artillery drill, or a landing party, or on guard detail, or when on duty ashore as patrol or beach master’s guard or as mail orderly. With leggings, high black shoes shall be worn, by naval officers and enlisted men.
24. (1) Swords shall be worn as prescribed in these regulations, and on other special occasions at the discretion of the senior officer present; at Saturday inspection, and other general inspections of the crew by the commanding officer; at parades at infantry or artillery drills, at military
formations on shore, or when leaving the ship, station, or garrison on military duty.
(2) The wearing of swords may be dispensed with in the field by order of the senior officer present.
(3) The sword shall be worn habitually hooked up, with the hilt inclining to the rear and the sling straps outside the scabbard. When mounted, the sword shall be worn unhooked. The prescribed sword belt and the proper sword knot (for all commissioned officers except chaplains) shall always be worn with the sword.
(4) When the sword is worn without other side arms, the sword belts hall be worn over the special full dress and frock coats of officers of the Navy and over the full dress coat and field coats of officers of the Marine Corps; and under the service coats of officers of the Navy and undress coats of officers of the Marine Corps.
(5) When worn with the overcoat without other side arms, the belt shall be worn under the overcoat, but the sword itself shall be worn outside the overcoat, with the long sling of the belt passing through the rear slit in the coat and the short sling through the side slit.
(6) When the revolver is carried, the belt shall be worn outside of every coat, including the overcoat, the revolver being worn slightly in front of the right hip. The cartridge attachments worn with the sword belt shall be worn in front and to the right and left of the belt buckle. If only
one cartridge attachment be worn, it shall be to the right of the buckle.
(7) At ordinary daily quarters on board ship, no arms shall be worn by officers unless their men are under arms, except on occasions when the drill instructions prescribe arms.
(8) Officers or men wearing side arms shall not remove their caps or other head covering except indoors.
(9) A petty officer on boat duty, in charge of a guard boat, or on other special duty, shall wear the service revolver belt, but this provision shall not apply to the coxswain of a boat, unless the boat crew is armed.
25. No watch chains, fobs, pins, or other jewelry shall be worn exposed upon the uniform by any officer or enlisted man of the Navy or Marine Corps, except sleeve buttons and shirt studs as prescribed.
26. (1) Medals and badges, or their ribbons, shall be worn in the following order, from the center of the body toward the left shoulder, except the medal of honor, which shall be worn pendent from the neck:
a) Medal of honor ribbon;
(b) Distinguished-service medal; 1
(c) Medal commemorating the battle of Manila Bay;
(d) Medal commemorating the naval engagements in the West Indies;
(e) Special meritorious medal for service during the Spanish war other than in battle;
(f) Gold life-saving medal;
(g) Civil war badge;
(h) Spanish campaign medal;
(i) Philippine campaign badge;
(j) China relief-expedition badge;
(k) Cuban pacification badge;
(l) Silver life-saving medal;
(m) Good-conduct medal;
(n) Medals or badges awarded for service performed while in the Army, Marine Corps, or other branch of Government, if not included in those specified above;
(o) Medals or badges for excellence in gunnery;
(p) Medals or badges for excellence in small-arms firing, in the following order: (1) Sharpshooter’s medal; (2) expert rifleman’s bar; (3) expert pistol shot’s bar; (4) distinguished marksman’s badge; (5) expert rifleman’s badge; (6) sharpshooter’s badge (not worn if 5 is held); (7) marksman’s badge (not worn if 5 or 6 is held); (8) Marine Corps competition individual medal; (9) Marine Corps division competition medal; (10) medals given by the National Rifle
Association for excellence in shooting at matches held under the cognizance of that association, worn in the order in which won.
(2) The wearing of the following badges (q,r,s) is optional with the holders; but if these or any of them are worn, none of the medals or badges awarded by the Government shall be worn at the same time with them:
(q) Authorized badges of military societies in the order of date of the wars which
they commemorate;
(r) Badge of the Army and Navy Union of the United States;
(s) Badge of the Enlisted Men’s Abstinence League.
(3) The badges referred to in subparagraph
(q) of the preceding paragraph are the distinctive medals and badges adopted by societies of men who have served in the Army or Navy of the United States in the War of the Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, the War of the Rebellion, the Spanish-American War and the incident insurrection in the Philippines, and the China Relief Expedition of 1900. The law permits them to be worn upon all occasions of ceremony by officers and men of the Army, Navy and Marine Corps who are members of said organizations in their own right. Persons who by right of inheritance and election are members of any of the above-named societies are members thereof in their own right.
(4) Medals and badges shall be worn—-
(a) By officers of the Navy with special full-dress uniform.
(b) By enlisted men of the Navy with dress uniform on occasions of ceremony other than parades under arms on shore.
(c) By officers of the Marine Corps with dress uniform on occasions of ceremony; and with other uniforms on occasions of ceremony when prescribed.
(d) By enlisted men of the Marine Corps with dress uniform on occasions of ceremony; and with other uniforms on occasions of ceremony when prescribed.
(5) Ribbons of medals and badges shall be worn—-
(a) By officers of the Navy on the frock coat, the evening dress coat, the mess jacket when worn with dinner dress, and the white service coat when worn on occasions of ceremony in place of
undress, dress, or full dress.
(b) By enlisted men of the Navy in dress uniform, except on those occasions when medals are prescribed, in 4, b, above.
(c) By officers of the Marine Corps, always with undress, white undress, field (except when the coat is not worn), and mess uniforms, and with those uniforms only, except as limited by
subparagraph (e) below.
(d) By enlisted men of the Marine Corps with dress uniform when medals and badges are not prescribed, and with field uniform (except when the coat is not worn), and with those uniforms
only, except as limited by subparagraph (e) below.
(e)When officers and enlisted men of the Marine Corps are serving on board a ship of the Navy they shall wear the ribbons of medals and badges only under the same conditions as
prescribed for officers and enlisted men, respectively, of the Navy.
(6) Medals and badges having no ribbons shall be worn only when other medals and badges are worn, except that an officer or enlisted man who has been awarded a gunnery medal or badge, an expert rifleman’s badge, a sharpshooter’s badge, or a marksman’s badge shall wear it as
prescribed in paragraph (1) of this article when ribbons of medals and badges are worn, one-fourth of an inch below the center of the row of ribbons.
(7) Medals, badges, or ribbons shall not be worn on the overcoat.
(8) The medal of honor shall be worn pendent from the neck. Other medals and badges shall be worn on the left breast, in one horizontal line, suspended from a single holding bar, the upper edge of which shall be, for officers of the Navy and Marine Corps and for enlisted men of the
Marine Corps, midway between the first and second buttons from the top of the coat, and for enlisted men of the Navy on a line 1 inch below the point of the shoulder (by the point of the shoulder is meant a point in front halfway between the top and the bottom of the shoulder joint). The holding bar, which shall not be longer than from front center line of the coat to the armhole seam, shall be so placed upon the uniform that its center shall be at a point midway between the front center line of the coat and the left armhole. When a medal or badge has an exposed bar at
the top of the ribbon such bar shall be mounted on the front of the holding bar or shall form a part of such bar, and where there are several such exposed bars on a single medal or badge the uppermost bar shall be so mounted. When the number of medals and badges to be worn is so
great that they can not all be suspended from a holding bar of the prescribed length and at the same time be fully seen, they shall overlap sufficiently to permit them all to be mounted on the bar, each medal or badge partially covering the one on its left, and the right hand one showing in full, the overlapping being equal for all of the medals and badges worn. The holding bar for the suspension of medals and badges shall be of metal or other material of sufficient stiffness and shall be wholly covered by the ribbons or exposed bars.
(9) Ribbons of medals and badges shall be worn in a horizontal row, clear of the lapel and, so far as practicable, at the same height and in the same order and manner as prescribed above for the bar of medals and badges. They shall be in length equal to the full width of the ribbon attached to the medal or badge and three-eighths of an inch wide and sewed on the cloth of the coat, with sufficient stiffness to keep them from wrinkling, without intervals, or worn on a bar and pinned to the coat, provided no portion of the bar and pin be visible. If there is not sufficient room to wear the ribbons in one row they shall not be made to overlap, as in the case of medals, but shall be arranged in two or more parallel rows, placed one under the other with an interval of one-quarter inch between the bottom of one row and the top of the next, the top row being placed as above described.
27. The officer of the deck shall wear gloves and carry a binocular or spyglass in port; and at sea he shall carry a binocular and have a deck trumpet or megaphone directly at hand.
28. The cloak or mackintosh may be worn in inclement weather, except at drills, exercises, and ceremonies, or when specially prohibited.
29. Gloves shall always be worn with the sword on occasions of ceremony, except by Marine officers in summer field dress. The senior officer present may prescribe gloves at any time.
30. The badge of official mourning shall consist of a black crape band 3 inches wide and about 20 inches long knotted upon the sword hilt, and a black crape band 3 inches wide worn on the left arm above the elbow.
31. The hair, beard, and mustache shall be worn neatly trimmed. The face shall be kept clean shaved, except that a mustache, or beard and mustache, may be worn at discretion. No eccentricities in the manner of wearing the hair, beard, or mustache shall be allowed.
32a.The use of sheath knives on board ship by the crew is forbidden, but every man of the seaman branch shall carry a jackknife.
32b. Knife lanyards do not form part of the uniform, but may be worn in working dress or at work requiring a knife, either around the neck or waist, as most convenient.
33. A sick list badge, consisting of an arm band of white cotton 2 inches wide, shall be issued by the medical officer to each enlisted man on the sick list, to be worn on the right arm above the elbow. The badge shall be distinctly marked in black block figures with a number, to be
entered upon the sick list furnished for the use of the officer of the deck. When a man’s name is removed from the sick list, he shall return his badge neatly washed to the dispensary.
34. The Geneva cross brassard shall consist of a band of white cotton bearing a red Geneva cross, painted or stitched on the band, to be fastened around the upper part of the right arm over the outer garment. The band shall be 4 inches wide, the cross 3 inches in height and width, and the arms of the cross 1 inch wide.
35. Commissary stewards shall wear the same uniform as chief commissary stewards, except that the rating badge shall bear the chevrons of a petty officer, first class, instead of a chief petty officer.
36. In warm weather chief petty officers may take off the coat and waistcoat when on duty below the main deck.
37. Overshirts, jumpers, trousers and underclothes shall be fitted with eyelets for stops.
38. Cooks at work in the galleys shall wear white undress without neckerchiefs, and white aprons. When not on duty there, they shall wear the uniform of the day. Messmen while performing their duties as such shall wear white undress, without neckerchiefs (marines, the corresponding uniform), and they may wear this uniform any time below decks, but at quarters and off duty they shall wear the uniform of the day. Mess attendants on board ship shall at all times wear the white jacket, with white or blue trousers, according to the prescribed uniform of the day. When leaving the ship, they shall wear the same uniform as other enlisted men.
39. The jersey may be worn, by men for whom prescribed, as an outer garment from sunset until 8 a. m., either in place of overshirt or jumper or over it. During the day the jersey may be prescribed as an outer garment for drills, exercises, or working parties on board ship, in boats, or on shore at a navy yard or naval station, to be worn in place of or over the overshirt or jumper. As an additional undergarment, the jersey may be prescribed to be worn under the jumper or overshirt; and boatswain’s mates, coxswains, quarter-masters, signalmen, sentries, and
others whose duties keep them exposed to the weather without sufficient exercise or work to keep them warm, and liberty men, may so wear it, night or day, even when not prescribed for the whole ship’s company. At training stations, the jersey shall be worn only as an outer garment, and only when prescribed. The jersey shall not show below the overshirt or jumper and shall never be worn without an undershirt nor be tucked inside the trousers. On July 1, 1913, the jersey will cease to be an article of uniform, except at the Newport and Great Lakes training stations as above described; but may still be worn for athletics, except during the prescribed physical drill and training.
40. At sea and in isolated shore anchorages for target practice or similar service, when hot weather or other conditions render it desirable, the uniform of the day for enlisted men may be modified by omitting the jumper, chief petty officers leaving off the coat and wearing white shirts, with belts instead of suspenders for the trousers. This uniform will be indicated by signal, and particular care must then be taken that none but clean uniform undershirts are worn and that a neat appearance is preserved at mess. Jumpers will be resumed at the supper hour. All cooks, mess attendants, members of the guard, and persons that have occasion to enter officers’ quarters shall not wear this uniform, and running steamers’ crews will be exempted unless otherwise especially directed. A morning signal fixing the uniform the same as the day before will not apply to this variation; a new signal will be required for each day. Commanding officers may exempt such men from omitting the jumper or overshirt as they may think advisable, lest it be a hardship to some who, being off watch, for instance, have no work to perform; but in units, such
as boats’ crews or signalmen, all must be dressed alike.
41. Shoes, neatly blacked, shall always be worn with dress and undress, with the latter, when the decks are wet or in hot climates or in boats, shoes may be dispensed with unless the men are to go ashore for any purpose. Shoes should be dispensed with whenever practicable in boats, all men in the crew being in uniform in this respect; but in steam or power boats the coxswain and engineer force may wear shoes while others are barefoot. Tan shoes may be ordered for marines when in white trousers and shall be worn by them when in field dress, or when leggings
are prescribed.
42. The watch cap may be worn at sea by men for whom prescribed, but not during day watches in port, except in foul or severe weather, cleaning, or refitting, if so ordered or permitted by the senior officer present, or coaling ship. It shall not be worn by chief petty officers, officers’ stewards and cooks, bandsmen, or marines.
43. Underclothing shall always be worn. Unless a particular weight of underclothing is prescribed, enlisted men may wear heavy, medium, or light, at discretion. No underclothing is regulation unless drawn from official sources.
44. Headgear shall be white by day when white is prescribed for any other portion of the uniform; except when white trousers are prescribed
with dress uniform for the Navy, or special full dress or full dress for the Marine Corps. White caps or white trousers or both may be prescribed with service dress and undress uniforms, white caps being always worn when white trousers are prescribed with these uniforms. White caps
shall not be worn with the naval evening dress coat or the Marine Corps blue mess jacket.
45. Overcoats may be ordered for officers or men or both when appropriate. When overcoats are worn, epaulets shall be dispensed with. Overcoats may be worn by officers and men, on or off duty, at sea or in port, on board their own ships, when the uniform of the day is service
dress, unless overcoats are expressly ordered not to be worn; but when called to quarters, only the prescribed uniform shall be worn. Under similar conditions, overcoats may be ordered for a whole boat’s crew, without reference to the senior officer present.
46. The overcoat prescribed for enlisted men (not chief petty officers) may be worn by officers on duty on board their own ships or at exercise in boats; but not by officers of the watch while colors are hoisted, except at sea or during general cleaning or coaling, nor by any officers at
quarters for inspection or other ceremony. Stripes shall be worn on the sleeves as on the regular uniform overcoat, article 93.
47. Rain clothes, with or without rubber boots, may be worn by officers and men in foul weather, at sea or in port, including getting underway and coming to anchor, and also by whole boats’ crews, unless specially ordered not to be worn. When the weather is too cold to go barefoot, men may wear rubber boots during wet weather or while washing down the deck, but rubber boots shall not be worn by the crews of steam or power boats.
48. Dungarees may be worn on board cruising vessels:
(a)By the engineer and dynamo-room force while on duty.
(b)By gunner’s mates, turret captains, electricians, mechanics, and men regularly detailed as helpers or strikers in turrets or in care of machinery below decks, instead of white working dress, while employed at work that would damage the white uniform.
(c)By engineer crews of steamers and power boats.
Dungarees shall not be worn nor had in possession by other men.
49. Officers shall limit their wearing of dungarees to the actual requirements of duty. They shall not wear them for duty above decks for which worn blue or white clothing would suffice.
50. Dungarees shall be worn by officers and men as a complete suit, with hat or cap as prescribed for the day. They shall not be worn at mess, except by engineer and dynamo force about to go on watch and engineer crews of steamers, and then only when the dungaree suits are clean.
51. Submarine vessels’ officers and crews may wear dungaree suits when on duty on board the submarines. Officers and crews of other torpedo vessels shall conform to the regulations for other types of vessels concerning wearing dungarees.
52. All wearing apparel drawn from a pay officer or from the quartermaster’s department of the Marine Corps shall be considered uniform.
53. Clothing made by the men for themselves, made by ship’s tailors for them, or received by them from other than official sources, shall conform strictly in material, pattern, and making-up to those issued by the Government; and no devices for blue and white caps, rating badges,
distinguishing marks, apprentice marks, service stripes, braids, or cap ribbons, other than those issued by the Government, are to be use by enlisted men under any circumstances. Fancy stitchings and embroidery are forbidden. Enlisted men of the Marine Corps shall wear only clothing and equipment drawn from the quartermaster’s department of the Marine Corps. All clothing not drawn from government sources shall be inspected by the division officer before being worn.
54. Standard samples of every article of enlisted men’s uniforms shall be kept at the naval clothing factory, or in the quartermaster’s department of the Marine Corps. The articles issued to ships shall conform in every respect to the standard samples, and no change shall be permitted without the sanction of the Secretary of the Navy. Pay officers of ships will be supplied with a set of paper patterns of sizes 3 and 5 of the overshirt, and 4, 8, and 12 of the trousers, for the use of enlisted men in making clothing.
55. The clothes, arms, military outfits, and accoutrements furnished by the United States to any enlisted person in the Navy or Marine Corps, or required by such persons as a part of their prescribed uniform or outfits, shall not be sold, bartered, exchanged, pledged, loaned, nor given
away, except by competent authority therefor.
56. No transfer or exchange of clothing shall be made without the authority of the commanding officer. When clothing belonging to deserters is sold, the name of the deserter shall be obliterated with a stamp marked “D C,” and the purchaser’s name shall be placed upon it as soon as possible.
57. The executive officer of a ship shall see that officers commanding divisions keep correct lists of their men’s clothing and have necessary requisitions made out, and that they are careful in the inspection of their divisions, their clothing, and their bedding. He shall prepare a dress board on which will be indicated the uniform of the crew, and place it in a conspicuous position on board.
58. Whenever recruits are received on board on a receiving ship or at a training station, they shall be required at once to have their hair cut, bathe, and report for physical examination. Upon the completion of the examination, should the recruits qualify, commanding officers shall have
the outfit of clothing issued to each and carefully marked. Commanding officers shall not allow recruits to keep on board any article of clothing not authorized by regulations except such underclothing in good condition as may be worn at the time of enlistment. All other citizens’
clothing must be disposed of as the recruit may desire. Clothing or small stores shall not be issued to recruits without the written order of the commanding officer.
59. (1) Officers of divisions shall take especial care that all outer and under clothing , overcoats, caps, hats, and bedding of the men are in accordance with the prescribed uniform in respect to quality pattern and color, and that every article is properly marked in accordance with these
regulations.
(2) They shall see that all materials drawn are used for the purpose required; that all clothing is neatly made, marked, and kept in order, and that none of it is sold; that the men are neat in person and clothing, and provided with regulation knives and lanyards; and that underclothing is
worn at all times unless dispensed with by order of the captain. All work done by the ship’s tailor shall be submitted to the division officer for inspection and approval before it is accepted or any payment made therefor.
60. Copies of all parts of these regulations necessary for the purpose will be furnished by the Bureau of Navigation, and shall be posted in places where they may be consulted at all times by enlisted men.

DESIGNATIONS OF UNIFORMS.

FOR ENLISTED MEN OF THE NAVY.
UAFB Blue dress.
UAFC Blue dress with white hats.
UAFD Blue dress with white hats; chief petty officers, bandsmen, and servants in white
trousers.
UAFE Blue undress.
UAFG Blue undress with white hats.
UAFH Blue undress with white hats; chief petty officers, bandsmen, and servants in
white trousers.
UAFI Blue undress without jumpers, and white hats.
UAFJ White dress.
UAFK White dress with blue trousers.
UAFL White undress.
UAFM White undress with blue trousers.
UAFN White undress without jumpers.
UAFO Blue working dress.
UAFP Blue working dress with white hats.
UAFQ Blue working dress with white hats; chief petty officers, bandsmen, and servants
in white trousers.
UAFR White working dress.
UAFS Dungarees with blue caps.
UAFT Dungarees with white hats.
UAFV Dungarees with watch caps.

FOR OFFICERS OF THE NAVY.
UABC Special full dress.
UABD White special full dress.
UABE Full dress
UABF White Full Dress.
UABG Dress.
UABH Dress, with white trousers.
UABI White Dress (or white undress).
UABJ Undress.
UABK Undress with white caps.
UABL Undress with white trousers and caps.
UABM Undress without swords.
UABN Undress with white caps, without swords.
UABO Undress with white trousers and white caps, without swords.
UABP Service dress.
UABQ Service dress with white caps.
UABR Service dress with white trousers and white caps.
UABS Service dress with swords.
UABT Service dress with white caps and swords.
UABV Service dress with white trousers, white caps, and swords.
UABW White service dress.
UABX White service dress with blue trousers.
UABY White service dress with swords.
UABZ White service dress with blue trousers and swords.
UACB Evening full dress.
UACD Evening dress.
UACE Evening dress with full dress trousers
UACF Evening dress with full dress trousers, epaulets, and blue cap.
UACG Dinner dress.
UACH Mess dress.
UACI Mess dress with white trousers.
UACJ Uniform-A,
UACK Uniform-A, all white.
UACL Uniform-B.
UACM Uniform-B, all white.
UACN Uniform-C; evening full dress
UACO Uniform-C; evening full dress without swords and blue caps
UACP Uniform-C; dinner dress.

The following may be ordered with the uniforms for which
prescribed by these regulations. To designate the uniform accordingly,
add any of the following phrases to the appropriate ones given in the
preceding paragraph.
MISCELLANEOUS.
UAJB With cloaks.
UAJC Without cloaks.
UAJD With overcoats.
UAJE With overcoats and hoods.
UAJF Without overcoats.
UAJG With rain clothes.
UAJH Without rain clothes.
UAJI With mackintoshes.
UAJK With flannel shirt under the overshirt or jumper.
UAJL Without flannel shirt.
UAJM With flannel shirt instead of jumpers.
UAJN Without Jumpers.
UAJO With flannel shirts for chief petty officers and servants.
UAJP With leggings.
UAJQ With leggings for all, including marines.
UAJR Without leggings.
UAJS With neckerchief.
UAJT Without neckerchief.
UAJV With revolvers and accessories.
UAJZ With canteens.
UAKB With canteens and haversacks.
W UAKC With canteens, haversacks, and knapsacks.
UAKD With revolvers and accessories and canteens.
UAKE With revolvers and accessories and canteens and haversacks.
UAKF With revolvers and accessories and canteens, haversacks, and knapsacks.
UAKG With blue caps.
UAKH With watch caps.
UAKI With white caps.
UAKJ With blue cloth hats.
W UAKL With white hats.
UAKM With russet leather shoes.
UAKN With white gloves.
UAKO With service gloves.
UAKP With woolen gloves.
UAKQ Without gloves.
UAKR With swords.
UAKS Without swords.
UAKT In heavy marching order.
UAKV In light marching order.
UAKW In heavy underclothes.
UAKX In medium underclothes.
UAKY In light underclothes.
UAKZ With black shoes.
UALB With high shoes.
UALC With white shoes.
UALD With white trousers.
B UALE Barefoot.
UALF With overcoats and capes.
UALG With capes.
UALH Fully equipped.
UALI With white belts.
W UALJ With tan leather belts.
UALK With webbing belts.
UALM With webbing belts without suspenders.

Special Uniforms
These uniforms are those which were worn on special occasions. They consist of the Special Full Dress, Dress, White Dress, Undress, White Undress, Evening Full Dress, Dinner Dress.

It should be noted that during the Great War years 1917-1919 all special and dress uniforms were abolished. Service dress was what every regular and reserve officer wore for all functions. Dress uniforms were reinstated after the war and once again abolished in WWII, but never reinstated afterwards.
The 1913 regulations were updated in 1917 through 1919 to reflect the requirements of the expanded navy and its various missions.
Notable additions:
20 July 1918
Optional Raincoat: Reversible, battleship gray, waterproof on one side, navy blue cloth or serge on other side may be worn as overcoat. Double breasted, black buttons, belted, tabs at bottom of sleeves, shoulder marks worn on blue side only.

1 April 1918
Winter & Summer Flight Service
In recognition of the need for naval aviators in the field for a practical uniform for flying. Winter uniform was in Marine Corps forestry green woolen cloth, summer in cotton khaki cloth.
Gloves: brown leather.
Overcoat: forestry green, sleeve stripes to be brown mohair.
Cap cover: forestry green.
Puttees: brown leather.
Shoes: high laced tan leather.
Flannel shirts: Marine Corps regulation.
Shoulder marks: to be sewn down to coat.
Buttons: standard gilt buttons.
Raincoat: To be rubber cloth and water proof. Same colour as Winter Service uniform with sleeve stripes, but no shoulder marks.
Rainproof cap cover: same cloth and colour as as above.
Working Dress: One piece overall suit to be worn over uniform of canvas, khaki, or moleskin cloth.
Naval Aviator’s Device: Wings of gold to be issued by the Bureau of Navigation.

Chapter XI
Warrant Officers Uniforms 1895 – 1922
Historical Background
Warrant officers hold their positions though warrants granted by the Secretary of the Navy. Chief warrant officers are commissioned officers appointed by the President of the United States. All are technical specialists that have risen from enlisted ratings. They are not eligible for command and serve in their respective fields of enlisted expertise. Warrant officers are divided into several branches: Seaman, Artificer, and Special.
In 1899 the Rank of Chief Warrant Officer was created. It stipulated that warrant boatswains, gunners, carpenters, and sailmakers, the original warrants of the navy, after ten years service from the date of their original warrants to be commissioned “chief warrant” officers.
This modification created a warrant officer that held a commission instead of a warrant. The sleeve ornamentation of uniforms was altered to differentiate between these ranks in an instruction dated 8 May 1899. Warrant officers wore a ¼ inch gold stripe broken with a 2 inch section of blue silk. Chief Warrant Officers wore a ½ inch stripe of gold with a 2 inch section of blue silk on their sleeves and shoulder marks.
Chief warrant officers wore silver embroidered insignia on their collars while their juniors wore insignias in gold.

Service Coats
Coats are identical to the style and patterns for officers as detailed in the previous chapter for all regulations 1897-1919.

Shoes and Boots
Same as officers as detailed in the previous chapter for all regulations.

Shirts, Collars, Cuffs
Same as officers as detailed in the previous chapter for all regulations.

Embroidered Collar Insignia
1913 Regulations:
Chief warrant officers, warrant officers, mates, and paymaster’s clerks shall wear on the collar on each side the following devices respectively:
(a) Chief Boatswain – two foul anchors crossed, embroidered in silver, surcharged at the point of crossing with a gold five pointed star, 5/8 inch in diameter, with one ray pointing midway between the stocks of the anchors and directly toward the neck edge of the collar.
(b) Chief gunner – a flaming, spherical shell, embroidered in silver, surcharged at the center of the shell with a gold five pointed star, 5/8 inch in diameter, one ray pointing directly away from the flame and parallel to the neck edge of the collar.
(c) Chief Machinist – a three blades propeller, embroidered in silver, surcharged at the center with a gold five pointed star, 5/8 inch in diameter, with one ray pointing along the axis of one blade of the propeller and directly toward the neck edge of the collar.
(d) Boatswain, gunner, and machinist shall wear corresponding insignia, but the devices to be embroidered in gold and the surcharged stars in silver.
(e) Chief carpenter and carpenter – a carpenter’s square, point down, embroidered in silver or in gold, respectively.
(f) Chief sailmaker and sailmaker – a diamond, embroidered in silver or in gold, respectively
with the long axis parallel to the neck edge of the collar.
(g) Chief pharmacist and pharmacist – a caduceus, embroidered in silver or in gold, respectively
with its horizontal axis parallel to the front edge of the collar.
(h) Paymaster’s clerks – Pay Corps device, embroidered in gold, the stem of the leaf pointing to the front of the collar, parallel to the neck edge.
(i) Mates – a binocular glass, embroidered in gold with less than 20 years’ service as mate, in silver after 20 years’ service as mate, with top and bottom parallel to the neck edge of the collar.

Warrant Officer Devices
Sleeve Ornamentation
1913 Regulations:
Sleeve marks…shall be as follows:
(b) Chief boatswains, chief gunners, and chief machinists – the same as for ensign (star and one stripe of ½ inch lace), except that the gold lace shall be woven with dark-blue silk thread for widths of ½ inch at intervals of 2 inches; if retired with the rank of lieutenant junior grade,
one stripe of ½-inch lace with one of ¼-inch lace set ¼ inch above it, the lace woven with dark-blue silk thread as prescribed above.
(c) Chief carpenter, chief sailmaker, and chief pharmacist – the same as chief boatswain, but without the stars.
(d) Boatswains, gunners, machinists, and mates – the stars prescribed for other line officers, placed 4 inches from the edge of the sleeve, but no stripes.
(e) Carpenters, sailmakers, pharmacists, and paymasters’ clerks – no sleeve marks.

Shoulder Straps
1897 Regulations
Not specified for warrant officers.
1905 Regulations
Abolished for all officers, never to appear again.

Shoulder Marks
After the creation of the rank of Chief Warrant Officer in 1899, gold stripes were added to sleeves of all blue coats. Shoulder marks the same size and design as for other officers were used with stripes and insignia as described above.

Chief Boatswain shoulder mark.
1913 Regulations
From 25 January 1913 until 24 June 1913 shoulder marks were abolished. In their stead, rank was to be shown on the sleeves of the overcoat by means of black braid. On the shoulders of the white service ecoats and mess jackets, metal devices were to be employed to show both rank and corps. White coats were to be made with a cloth strap of the coat material, let in at the sleeve head seam, and fastened near the collar by a button. Eyelets were to be provided to receive the pin-on devices. This is the first use of the metal insignia now worn on shirts of khaki and on various light coats by officers of the navy.
Shoulder marks per the 1905 regulations were used once again.
Cap
Same as officers as detailed in the previous chapter for all regulations.

Cap Device
1897, 1905
For warrant officers, mates, and paymaster’s clerks, the device shall be two gold foul anchors
crossed, mounted as above for commissioned officers.
Chief warrant officers were authorised to wear the cap device for commissioned officers in 1902.

Chin strap
1897, 1899 Regulations:
…For warrant officers, mates, and clerks the strap shall be the same as for
commissioned officers, but only ¼ inch wide.
1902 Change
Chin strap to be ½ inch as for all commissioned officers.
General Order 48, 1 July 1902
Chief Warrant Officers were allowed to wear the cap device for commissioned officers.

Blue and white caps for warrant officers
25 January 1913
Dungarees officially authorised for officers.
Chapter XII
Chief Petty Officers Uniforms 1893-1922
Overview
Creating the CPO impression might be a bit less daunting than that of a warrant or commissioned officer. There is a possibility that you can begin with a standard service dress blue coat and modify it. The double breasted white coats of yesteryear will pretty much need to be custom tailored. Rating badges are available online at many websites, as are cap devices and buttons.
Historical Background
On 1 April 1893 the rating of Chief Petty Officer was created. The navy’s enlisted structure underwent a major revision with the creation of the new rating of chief petty officer. The 1885 ratings were adjusted to fill the top rates, and petty officers with “class” as part of their titles were introduced. The order that outlined the new rating structure also specified the uniform and insignia for the new chief petty officers: They would wear the jackets and caps formerly used by first class petty officers, and rating badges with three arcs on top, the same as masters-at-arms had used since 1886. First class petty officers kept their former rating badges but would now wear seamen’s jumper uniforms.

Blue Coat and Waistcoat
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
The blue coat shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, of a double-breasted sack pattern, with rolling collar; front and back of the skirt to descend to the top of the inseam of the trousers; lined with dark blue flannel or black Italian cloth; one pocket on the left breast and one on each front
near the bottom; Four medium-sized gilt buttons on each breast, equally spaced, none to be placed under the collar. The coat shall be worn buttoned. For undress, a flannel or serge coat of similar make may be worn.
The waistcoat shall be of the same material as the coat; single breasted, without collar, cut high in front, with six small-size gilt navy buttons, the upper button being not more than 4 inches below the collar button in the neckband of the shirt.

Dress Blue Dress White Overcoat
Blue Trousers
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
Made of dark navy-blue cloth, cut in the same manner as undress trousers for officers. For undress, flannel or serge trousers of similar make may be worn with flannel or serge coats.

White Coat
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
The white coat shall be made of bleached cotton drill, of 6½ to 7 ounces, of pattern heretofore described for the blue coats of the several ratings, but without lining, and pockets overlaid without flaps; the buttons shall be medium-sized gilt ones for chief petty officers, and white
for officers’ stewards and officers’ cooks, held in place by ring eyelets.

White Trousers
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
Made of bleached cotton drill, of 6½ to 7 ounces, cut and made up similar to the blue cloth trousers.
Buttons
1897, 1905 Regulations:
Gilt (same as for officers’ uniform).—Medium size, seven-tenths (7/10) of an inch in diameter; small size, nine-sixteenths (9/16) of an inch in diameter.

Overcoat
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
The overcoats shall be of heavy, dark navy-blue cloth, lined with dark blue flannel, the bottom of the skirt reaching to the knees, double breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar of the same material as the coat and broad enough when turned up to protect the ears. It shall have five large-size black navy buttons on each front, the lower buttons placed on a line a little below the opening of the horizontal pocket, the others equally spaced up to the throat. There shall be an
outside pocket in each breast, the openings vertical, the middle about level with the elbow. There shall also be a horizontal pocket, with flap cover, placed in each front below the line of the waist. The overcoat shall be worn completely buttoned.

Blue Cap
In 1893 until 1897 the cap was worn as described below with a large version of the officer’s gilt button instead of the gilt anchor device.

1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
The blue cap shall be of dark navy-blue cloth, with a band of lustrous black mohair; visor of black patent leather, bound with same, green underneath; chin strap of black patent leather, ½ inch wide, fastened at the side with two small gilt navy buttons, and provided with one gilt and
one leather slide; two small eyelet ventilating holes in each side of the quarters. The device shall be of metal, consisting of the letters USN in silver upon a slightly inclined gilt foul anchor. The crown to be from 1 to 1¼ inch greater in diameter than the base, to be stiffened, and have a
non metallic grommet, to retain its shape.

Cap Device 1893-1897 CPO Cap Cap Device , 12 June 1897
White Cap
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
This shall be a skeleton cap of the same shape and appearance as the blue cap, having a band covered with navy-blue cloth, which band shall be 2 inches wide, suitably stiffened, with a welt
3/16 of an inch from the lower edge. The cap shall be worn with an outside band of black mohair
similar to the blue cap. Chief petty officers shall wear the same device with the white cap as is worn with the blue. The visor, chin straps, and buttons shall be the same as in caps of blue cloth, the crown to be kept in shape by a nonmetallic grommet. The cover shall be separate from the
cap and shall be made of 6½ to 7 ounce bleached drill. The band of the cover shall be 1¾ inches wide, the bell of the crown being in two pieces
and 1 5/8 inches wide, with two lap seams on the sides over the buttons and sewed to top of the crown by a lap seam. The lower edge of the cover shall rest on the welt in the blue cloth band.

Shirt & Cuffs
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
These shall be plain white linen or cotton shirts of ordinary pattern and plain white standing collars and cuffs. Cuff buttons to be of plain gold or gilt, shirt buttons of mother-of-pearl.
Flannel Shirt
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
Dark navy-blue flannel, with a small turn-down collar of the same material; three small-size black navy buttons on front and one on each cuff.

Cravat
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:
To be of black ribbed silk, not more than 36 nor less than 32 inches long and not more than 1¼ inches nor less than7/8 inch wide, of uniform width throughout its length, and to be tied in a double bow knot.

Shoes
1897 Regulations:
Of black calfskin, both high and low; heels broad and low; soles broad and thick; strongly curved on outside and straight on inside; thin leather lining; the high shoes to have full tongue stitched water-tight to the flaps; shoe strings to be of strong leather.
1913 Regulations:
They shall be of the pattern prescribed by the Bureau of Navigation and furnished by the Bureau of Supplies and Accounts, with broad toe and broad, low heels. With leggings, only high shoes to be worn. Light gymnasium shoes of prescribed pattern to be worn at physical training exercises.

White shoes of a similar pattern shall be worn by chief petty officers with white trousers, except when otherwise directed by these regulations, and may also be worn by other enlisted men in the
Philippines, when prescribed by the commanding officer.

Rating Badge
1897 Regulations:
Chief petty officers to wear three (3) stripes with an arch of one (1) stripe forming the are of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of chevron, the outside radius of the circle being one and seven-eighths (1 7/8) inches; the specialty mark to be in the center of the field under the arch, and to be entirely included in a circle one (1) inch in diameter; the eagle to rest on the center of the top of the arch.

1894 CPO Badge 1893-1894 badge Comparison between 1893 and 1886 size badge
1905 Regulations:
To consist of a spread eagle above a specialty mark and a class chevron. The chevrons are to be made of stripes of scarlet cloth 3/8 inch wide, separated 1/4 inch, and sewed flat without padding by an overlock stitch of scarlet silk on the edges of the chevrons. The badge as made up to cover a field 34 inches broad; the specialty mark to be in the center of the field in the angle of the upper stripe, and the eagle to be 1 1/2 inches above the angle and just above the specialty mark.
Chief petty officers to wear three stripes, with an arch of one stripe forming the arc of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of the chevron, the outside radius of the circle being 1 7/8 inches; the specialty mark to be in the center of the field under the arch; the eagle to rest on the center of the top of the arch
For blue clothing the eagle and specialty marks are to be embroidered in white, and for white clothing in blue, except for hospital stewards and hospital apprentices, first class, the specialty marks for these being of red cloth for both blue and white clothing, laid on the same as chevrons.
For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good-conduct badges, the chevrons are to be made of gold lace, instead of scarlet cloth.
1913 Regulations:
Chief petty officers shall wear chevrons of three stripes, with an arch of one stripe forming the arc of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of the chevron, the outside radius of the circle being 1 7/8 inches; the specialty mark being in the center of the field under the arch, the eagle
resting on the center of the top of the arch.
The rating badge shall be worn on the right sleeve by all petty officers of the seaman branch, midway between shoulder and elbow, and by all other petty officers on the left sleeve. The rating badge shall be worn on the blue coat and white coat of chief petty officers, commissary steward, and first musician; and on the overshirt and jumpers of all other petty officers.
No rating badge or specialty mark is regulation unless drawn from the pay officer, except under article 209.

Service Stripes
1897 Regulations:
Continuous-service marks, of scarlet cloth, eight (8) inches long, the side edges being turned under until they meet on the under­side, to show a width of three-eighths (3/8) of an inch, to be wore on left sleeve diagonally across the outside of forearm at an angle of forty-five (45) degrees, one for each complete reenlistment for three (3) years under continuous service, one-quarter (1/4) of an inch apart. On coats and white jumpers, the lower end of first stripe will not be less than two (2) inches from the cuff edge of the sleeve.
1905 Regulations:
Continuous-service marks, To be worn by all continuous­ service men on the left sleeve, on blue and white coats, overshirts, and dress jumpers; to be made of scarlet cloth 8 inches long, the side edges turned under until they meet on the under side, each stripe, to show a width of 3/8 inch; when more than one, stripes to be 1/4 inch apart; to be stitched on the sleeve diagonally across the outside of the fore­arm, at an angle of 45°; on coats. the lower end of the first stripe to be not less than 2 inches from the cuff end of the sleeve; on the overshirt and dress jumper, the lower end of the first stripe to be 4 inches above the upper edge of the cuff; one stripe for each com­plete term of enlistment of three or four years under continuous service. For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good­ conduct badges, the continuous-service stripes are to be made of gold lace, instead of scarlet cloth.
1913 Regulations:
These shall be worn by all re-enlisted men on the left sleeve, on blue and white coats, overshirts, and jumpers; and shall be made of scarlet cloth 8 inches long on blue clothes, and of blue cloth on white clothes, the side edges being turned under until they meet on the under side, each stripe showing a width of 3/8 inch; when more than one stripe is worn they shall be ¼ inch apart. These stripes shall be stitched on the sleeve diagonally across the outside of the forearm at an angle of 45 degrees, with thread the color of the stripe. On coats, the lower end of the first stripe shall be not less than 2 inches from the cuff end of the sleeve; on the overshirt and dress jumper, the lower end of the first stripe shall be 4 inches above the upper edge of the cuff. There shall be one
stripe for each complete term of enlistment of three or four years. For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good-conduct badges, the service stripes on blue clothing shall be made of gold lace.

Uniform Articles
1897, 1905, 1913 Regulations:

Blue Dress
Chief petty officers, except bandmasters, and for officer’s stewards and officer’s cooks.
Blue cloth coat.
Blue cloth trousers (white trousers may be prescribed when officers are in blue with
white trousers).
Blue cap (white cap shall be worn with white trousers, and may be prescribed also when
officers are in blue with white caps).
Blue waistcoat.
White shirt.
White collar and cuffs.
Cravat.
Black shoes (white shoes with white trousers).

White Dress
Chief petty officers, except bandmasters, and for officer’s stewards and officer’s cooks.
White coat.
White trousers.
White cap.
White shirt.
White collar.
Cravat.
Black shoes for all except chief petty officers,
who shall wear white shoes.

Blue Undress
Chief petty officers, except bandmasters, and for officer’s stewards and officer’s cooks.
Blue flannel or serge coat.
Blue flannel or serge trousers (white may be prescribed when officers are in blue with white trousers).
Blue cap (white caps may be prescribed when officers are in blue with white caps; white caps shall be worn with white trousers).
White shirt and collar with cravat (blue flannel shirt may be prescribed).
Black (white shoes may be prescribed with white trousers for chief petty officers,
except when employed in work for which they are inappropriate).
Blue flannel or serge waistcoat permitted.
Clothing that has been long in use as dress may be worn for undress.

White Undress
Same as for white dress, but clothing that has been long in use may be worn.
Black (white shoes may be prescribed for chief petty officers, except when employed in work for which they are inappropriate).

Working Dress, Blue or White
Same as for undress; but chief petty officers may lay aside the coat, wearing the blue flannel shirt, if the uniform is blue; and the others may wear the working dress prescribed for other enlisted men, when doing work such as to require it.

 Brief Timeline
Commissioned Officer’s Cap Device adopted- 1869
Warrant Officer’s Cap Device adopted- 1869
White Cap introduced for warm weather-1873
Service Blue Coat adopted with black mohair sleeve ornament- 1877
Service Blue Coat to be worn by all officers & Cadet Midshipmen, Cadet Engineers, and USNA Midshipmen- 1878
Line Warrant Officers (Boatswains & Gunners) to wear a gold star (under 20 years service), silver star (over 20 years) service on sleeve and collar.
Staff Warrant Officers (Carpenters, Sailmakers, Paymasters, Stewards to wear embroidered diamond on collar only.
Embroidered Corps Devices added to collars-1883
White Service Coat with white sleeve ornament, white cap, or helmet adopted- 1883
Boatswains, Carpenters, Gunners, Mates, Payclerks, devices established-1883
Chief Petty Officer rating created- 1894
CPO cap device of anchor and USM adopted-1897
Flag and Senior officer’s cap visor oak leaves and acorn designs adopted-1897
Gold sleeve ornament and stars added to Blue Service Coat- 1897
Staff officers have coloured cloth assigned for sleeve ornamentation-1897
Shoulder straps adopted for White Service Coat- 1897
Rank of Chief Warrant Officer created- 1899
Shoulder Marks (boards) established- 1899
Warrant Officer’s get gold and blue sleeve stripes-1899
Engineer Corps integrated with Line-1899
White Service Coat introduced- 1902
Chief Warrant Officers wear commissioned officers cap insignia-1902
Dungaree uniforms officially approved-1902
Old style shoulder straps abolished for white uniforms-1905
Civil Engineering Corps device established- 1905
Dungarees approved for Officers and men-1913
Dental Corps sleeve colour of orange established-1913
“US Naval Reserve Force” Tally for enlisted established- 1915
Khaki & Forestry Green aviator’s uniforms approved-1917
New Blue Service coat adopted-1919
Warrant Officer’s get ¼ inch blue and gold stripe-1917

Links:

Historic Textiles
http://www.historicaltextiles.com/Links.html
Woolen fabric by the yard, rivets, clips, hooks, notions, cotton webbing, elastic, used professional sewing machines.
Fleischman Fabrics
705 S 5th St, Philadelphia, PA 19147
(215) 925-1113
(No website)
Period Fabric
http://periodfabric.com/
Canvas & Webbing
http://www.ahh.biz/canvas/

Custom Gold & Silver Insignias and Embroidery
Hand & Lock
http://www.handembroidery.com/

Neckwear, Collars, Braces, Stock & custom civilian & uniform apparel & tailoring
History in the Making
http://www.historyinthemaking.org/links.html
Collars
http://www.gentlemansemporium.com/store/shirts.php?&type=Detachable%20Collars
Mohair Braids
http://www.ricebraid.com/UMSS.cfm?page=page-index.cfm&template_code=Home

Period Belt Buckles, Belt Plates, Custom Hot Metal Casting
Hanover Brass
http://www.hanoverbrass.com/

Map Case
Special Forces
http://www.specialforces.com/czech-brown-leather-map-case

Bell Crown Caps
Leon Company
http://www.leonuniform.com/Midway-BellCrownCap.htm
Bayly, Inc
http://www.baylyinc.com/new/police/fire.html
Siegel’s Uniforms
http://www.siegelsuniforms.com/bell-crown-cap

WWI CPO Cap Device and period military insignia
Weingarten Gallery
http://www.1903.com/WWI-Chief-Petty-Officer-CPO-Hat-Devise-Gold-over-Sterling-silver-p1278.html

Repro Leather Holsters, etc.
http://www.pacificcanvasandleather.com/holsters/pcl_13_r.htm

High top Smooth toe shoes
Generic Supply
http://store.genericsurplus.com/boots/ledger-mid-oxblood.html
High top cap toe shoes
Stacy Adams “Madison”
http://www.stacyadams.com/shop/style/00015-01.html

 

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