Enlisted Uniforms

UNIFORM FOR ENLISTED MEN, UNITED STATES NAVY. (1897)

GENERAL   REGULATIONS.

1. The naval uniform shall he worn by all enlisted men of the Navy when attached to vessels belonging to or employed by the Government and when serving at navy yards or stations.

2. The particular dress for the day shall be fixed by the senior officer present, with due regard to the duty to be performed and the state of the weather.

3. The uniform, to be designated as (1) blue dress, (2) blue undress, (3) white dress, (4) white undress, or (5) working dress, is as follows:

Dress.

To be worn on all occasions of ceremony.

For chief petty officers (except bandmasters), stewards, and offi­cers’1 cooks.—Blue cloth or white coat; blue cloth or white trousers; blue or white cap; waistcoat (only with blue coat); white shirt, collar, and black cravat.

TEXAS- CPO's_Crop

For mess attendants.—Blue cloth or white jacket; blue cloth or white trousers; blue or white cap; white collar.

For bandsmen.—Dress coat; blue cloth or white trousers; hel­met; shoulder knots and aiguillettes; belt; gloves (and sword for bandmaster).

For all other enlisted men.—Blue overshirt or dress jumper;  blue cloth or white dress trousers; blue cap or white hat; necker-chief and knife lanyard.

Undress.

To be worn on ordinary occasions.

For chief petty officers (except bandmasters), stewards, and officers’1 cooks.—The same as dress, but clothing longer in use may be worn. Flannel coats and trousers and undress shirts are permitted.

For mess attendants.—The same as dress, but clothing longer in use may be worn.

For bandsmen.—Undress coat; blue cloth or white trousers; blue undress cap, or cap and cap cover.

For all other enlisted men.—Blue overshirt or undress jumper; blue cloth or flannel, or white undress trousers; blue cap, white hat, or watch cap; neckerchief and knife lanyard.

Working Dress.

To be worn by details of men, or by individuals, engaged in work for which this dress may be necessary.

For all enlisted men.—The same as undress, but clothing longer in use to be worn. The watch cap may be worn, except by chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen.

4. Shoes neatly blacked shall be worn with dress and undress.

5. A blue flannel jumper, similar in make to the blue overshirt, but the same length as the white jumper and hemmed in the same manner around the bottom, may be permitted in warm weather.

6. From sunset to 8 a. m. the jersey may be worn over the undershirt as an outer garment, except in boats. In cold weather  the jersey may be worn at all times between the undershirt and overshirt or jumper.

7. Overcoats may be worn with any of the prescribed uniforms  in cold weather.

8. Rain clothes and rubber boots may be worn by all men belonging to the deck watches or boats’ crews when exposed to inclement weather.

9. Chief petty officers, when on duty below the spar deck, may, in warm weather, take off the coat and waistcoat if the blue shirt is worn.

10. Chief petty officers, bandsmen, and messmen may draw the white undress jumper and trousers, and may wear them when their work is such as to require it.

11. The watch cap may be worn at sea. It shall not be worn during the day watches in port except under special circumstances, such as sail or spar drill, cleaning, refitting, and coaling ship, and then only by permission of the senior officer present.

12. Underclothing shall always be worn.

13. The hair and beard shall be worn neatly trimmed. If no beard or mustache is worn, the face shall be kept clean-shaved. No eccentricities in the manner of wearing the hair and beard shall be allowed.

14. The haversack is to be worn in rear of the left hip and the canteen in rear of right hip, with cartridge belt over both haver­sack slings and the rear sling of the canteen.

15. Leggings shall be worn, with any form of dress, when under arms for infantry or artillery drill or for duty with the landing  party.

16. Overshirts, jumpers, trousers, and underclothes shall be  fitted with eyelets for stops.

17. Every article of clothing shall be legibly marked with the owner’s name, as follows:

Overshirts.—On the outside of the front and on the inside of back, both marks being placed one inch from the bottom of the  shirt, the former across the center line and the latter to the right of the center line, also on the underside of the collar.

Jumpers.—On the inside, two inches above the hem, across the center line of the front and to the right of the center line of the back, also on the underside of the collar.

Trousers.—On the inside of the back of both legs, four inches from the bottom.

Undershirts.—On the outside of the front, one inch from the bottom of the shirt and to the right of the center.

Drawers.—On the outside of the right half waistband.

Neckerchief.—In center.

Cloth cap.—Inside crown.

Watch cap.—Inside, half inch from bottom.

White hat.—Inside crown.

Leggings.—Inside, on center piece three inches from and parallel to top.

Overcoat.—Center of underside of collar. On lining each side of split of tail three inches from and parallel to bottom.

Mattress.—In center, four inches from each end.

Mattress cover.—Right corners, four inches from open end.

Blankets.—All the right-hand corners, four inches from each edge.

18. No transfer or exchange of clothing shall be made without the authority of the commanding officer. When clothing belonging to deserters is sold, the name of the deserter shall be obliterated by the master-at-arms with a stamp marked D. C., and the pur­chaser’s name shall be placed upon it as soon as possible.

19. Clothes made by the men for themselves shall conform strictly in material, pattern, and making-up to those issued by the paymaster, and no devices for chief petty officers’ caps, rating badges, specialty marks, apprentice marks, service stripes, braids,  or cap ribbons, other than those issued by-the paymaster, are to be used by enlisted men under any circumstances. Fancy and embroidered stitchings are forbidden.

MARYLAND- Tailoring & Mascots 1912

20. Officers’ cooks at work at the galley shall wear cooks’ white caps and white aprons.

21. Enlisted men to whom medals of honor, good-conduct medals, or medals for proficiency as apprentices or marksmen, or for life saving, have been awarded, shall wear them with dress uniform. The medal shall be worn attached to its ribbon; the upper edge of the ribbon to be in a horizontal line, on the left breast of the outer garment, one inch below the shoulder, the medal of honor to be placed farthest from the shoulder; the others in the order of date of receipt from right to left.

22. The surgeon shall issue to each enlisted man on the sick list a white-cotton, arm band 2 inches wide, which will be worn around the right arm above the elbow. The badge shall be distinctly marked in black block figures, and the number shall be entered  upon the sick list furnished for the use of the officer of the deck. When a man’s name is removed from the sick list, he shall return his badge, neatly washed, to the surgeon.

23. When circumstances require the observance of the agree­ments in regard to the wearing of the Geneva cross, the brassard shall consist of a band of white cotton, to be fastened around the upper part of the right arm, over the outer garment. Upon the band shall be painted or stitched a red Geneva cross. The band shall be 4 inches wide, the cross 3 inches in height and width, and the arms of the cross 1 inch wide.

24. Copies of these regulations shall be posted in places where they may be consulted at all times by enlisted men.

25. There shall be kept at the naval clothing manufactory a standard sample of every article mentioned in these regulations.  The articles issued to ships shall conform in every respect to the standard samples, and no change shall be permitted without the sanction of the Secretary of the Navy. Pay officers of ships will be supplied with paper patterns of sizes 1, 3, and 5 of the overshirt, and 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 of the trousers, for the use of enlisted men in making clothing.

Blues

Blue Overshirts & Blouses

Originally called overshirts (1886) , The term “jumper” was used for white uniforms and was called a “jumper” when describing the undress blue version in 1922 and thereafter. Photographs on this page illustrates the variety of how the upper section was patterned before the standard “shield” pattern established.

Blue Blouse_detail_C

Note the pattern where the upper double layer of cloth meets the single layer of the body across the chest.

From the 1886 Naval Uniform Regulations

OVERSHIRT.

Dark navy-blue flannel, sufficiently long to allow for shrinkage, to be loose around the body; the back and breast to be of double thickness, such double part to descend 4 inches below the line of the shoulder-blades; large square collar, of double thickness, of the same material; cuff’s sufficiently large to allow for shrinkage, fastened with two small-size black navy buttons; to the inside of each side of the neck opening there shall be sewed a flap made of double thickness of flannel; these flaps shall button together over the throat with two small-size black navy buttons; small pocket in right breast.

Blue Blouse_detail_B

From the 1897 Naval Uniform Regulations:

OVERSHIRT.

Of dark navy-blue flannel, loose in the body; back and breast to be of double thickness, such double part to descend four (4) inches below the line of the shoulder blades, and to be cut with a deep shield shape. Neck opening to extend downward seven (7) inches, and to be covered by a detachable breast piece of double thickness, having button-holes in each corner and secured by four (4) corresponding buttons on inside of shirt. Sleeves to be from twenty (20) to twenty-three (23) inches in circumference, and to be sewed to cuffs in six box or double  plaits,   over  the  lower  edges  of  which the upper edges of cuffs will be sewed. Collar of double thickness; to be from nine (9) to ten (10) inches deep and from fifteen (15) to eighteen (18) inches long (according to size of shirt); square corners, to be trimmed with three (3) stripes of white linen tape three-sixteenths (3/16) of an inch wide and three-sixteenths (3/16) of an inch apart, the outer stripe to be one-quarter (¼) of an inch from the edge, the stripes to extend down in front to the bottom of the neck opening; to have a plain five-pointed star, three-quarters (¾) of an inch in diameter, worked in white in each corner, its center to be one and one-eighth (1⅛) inches from inside (bottom and side) edges of inner stripe. Cuffs of double thickness, three (3) inches deep, with wrist slits extending three (3) inches above the upper edge of cuffs; to be fastened with two small black navy buttons; to be trimmed around with stripes of white linen tape three-sixteenths (3/16) of an inch wide, as follows: For petty officers of the first, second, and third classes and enlisted men of the seaman first class, three (3) stripes, one-quarter (¼) of an inch apart, the middle stripe to be in the center line of the cuff; for enlisted men of the seaman second class, two (2) stripes, one-quarter (¼) of an inch apart, the middle line of the space between the stripes to come over the middle of the cuff; for enlisted men of the seaman third class, one (1) stripe, placed over the middle line of the cuff. A  small pocket to be let into the left breast with a straight opening, strengthened at each end by a crow’s-foot, or diamond point,  worked in black silk; lining of pocket to be of same material as  shirt.

The sizes of overshirts shall be as follows:

Size.

Chest.

Sleeve.

Length of garment.

1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

5 . . . . . . . . . . . . .

6 . . . . . . . . . . . .

Inches.

48

46

44

42

40

39

Inches.

34

33½

32½

31½

30½

30

Inches.

33½

33

32

31

30

29½

Blue Blouse_detail_G

Blue Blouse_detail_F

From the 1922 Naval Uniform Regulations

180. Overshirt.—Blue flannel, loose, square sailor collar; trimmed with three stripes of white tape on the edge and two embroidered white stars in the corner. Open in the neck and finished at the bottom with turn-up hem and draw string; the length shall be such that the overhang will fully cover the top of the trousers. (See par. 317 for detailed specifications.)

Body.—A loose cut jumper made of dark navy-blue flannel with taped collar and cuffs. To be worn with the bottom hem drawn snugly around the body at the topof the trousers and the bight of the shirt hanging blouse-fashion from 2 to 4 inches lower; not to be worn with the bottom of shirt tucked into the trousers; yoke making double thickness across chest and back; two eyelet holes in hem 3/4 inch on each side of side seams and 3/4 inch from bottom, also two eyelet holes1 1/2 inches apart in centerof front on inside of hem for drawstring.

Neck.—Neck opening to extend about 7 inches downward. A flannel loop 2 inches long 1/2 inch wide placed horizontally 2 inches below the bottom of the neck opening for neckerchief to pass through, and a similar loop shall be stitched under the collar at the back of the neck for the neckerchief to be roved through.

Collar.—The collar to be of double thickness, from 9 to 10 inches deep and from 12 1/2 to 14 1/2 inches wide, according to the size of the shirt. The collar to be trimmed with three stripes of white linen tape 3/16 inch wide and 3/16 apart, the outer strip 1/4 inch fromthe edge of collar. A plain five-pointed star 3/4 inch in diameter to be worked in white with one point on a line with corner of tape and collar.  Points to be 1 3/8 inches from inner row of tape.

Sleeve.—The sleeve at wrist to be gathered into a cuff with six small knife plaits; sleeves to be from 17 to22 1/2 inches in circumference.

Cuffs.—Cuffs to be 2 inches deep, of double material and taped according to rating, to fasten with two Navy black-rubber buttons, 24 ligne anchor. Cuffs shall be trimmed around except for 1 1/2 to 2 inches of the circumference with stripes of white linen tape 3/16 inch wide, 3/16 of an inch apart. The stripe ends of the cuffs that are trimmed with 2 or three stripes shall be joined by tape. Number of stripes shall be as follows: Petty officers and nonrated men, 1st class, wear three rows of tape; nonrated men, 2nd class, wear two rows of tape; and nonrated men, 3rd class, wear one row of tape.

Pocket.—A small pocket of the same material cord-piped, opening3 1/2 inches 3 1/2 inches and 4 1/2 inches above yoke in left breast; opening to be horizontal and to be finished at each end with a silk crow tack.

81. Jumper, undress, blue.—Same material and general cut as overshirt, but  with plain collar without trimmings, no cuffs, sleeves cut square at cuff opening.  (See par. 318 for detailed specifications.)

Blue Undress, from 1917 USN Uniform Regulations

Blue Undress, from 1917 USN Uniform Regulations

MATERIAL. – Navy Standard Blue, 11 ounce flannel.

Body.- Same as overshirt, except 2 inches shorter.

Neck.- Same as overshirt.

Collar.- Same as overshirt, but without tape and star.s

Sleeves.-.Short sleeves, no cuffs, plain 1 inch hem. For length of sleeves, see table below.

Pocket.—Same as overshirt.

Blue Blouse_detail_E

Blue Dress Overshirt

Blue Blouse_detail_D

Blue Dress Overshirt

Trousers

From 1897 Uniform Regulations

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, stewards, officers’ cooks, and bandsmen (Pl. VIII, figs. 3 and 4).—Of dark navy blue cloth; to fit snugly over the hip and down the thigh to two (2) inches above the knee, from which point downward to be cut bell-shaped and full enough to be pulled over the thigh; one seam on each leg on the inside; wide turn-up hem at the bottom. Waist­band to be two (2) inches wide in front and one and one-half (1½) inches wide at the back, fastened in front by two (2) buttons, the lower one serving also as the center button for the flap; to have a gusset at center of back, two (2) inches wide at top (when open)  and four and one-half (4½) inches deep—that is, three (3) inches below the band—with six (6) eyelet holes on each side, two (2) of which shall be in each end of waistband, and a flat black-silk lacing, three-eighths (⅜) of an inch wide, run through them. Flap to be six and one-half (6½) inches deep, with a crow’s foot worked in black silk at the lower corners; upper corners to be rounded; to have eleven (11) buttonholes around the sides and upper edge so arranged as to show seven (7) across the top and three (3) on each side. Pocket in waistband on each side. Small black navy buttons to be used.

The sizes of the trousers shall be as follows:

Size.

Waist.

Inseam.

Bottom.

Knee.

Seat.

1……………………

2……………………

3……………………

4……………………

5……………………

6……………………

7……………………

8……………………

9……………………

10………………….

35

33

34

32

33

32

31

30

31

29

Inches.

33

33

32

32

31

31

30

30

29

Inches.

24

24

23½

23½

23½

23

23

22½

22

Inches.

23

23

23

22½

22½

22

22

21½

21½

Inches.

42

40

40

39

39

38

38

37

36

Flannel trousers to be cut and made same as the blue-cloth trousers.

Headgear

From 1897 Uniform Regulations

(d) For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers’ mess-men, and bandsmen (Pl. II, figs. 2 and 3).—Of dark navy-blue cap cloth; band of finished cap to be two (2) inches wide, stiffened on the inside with a strip of suitable material two (2) inches wide, and lined with a thin leather sweat band. Quarterings to be in four (4) pieces, and, in finished cap, to be from one and three-quarters (1¾) to two (2) inches in width, sewed together with double seams, and without any slack cloth. Crown cut in one piece to correspond with the outer diameter of the quarterings; to be lined with suitable material, and sewed to the quarterings with a double seam. A plain double bow of ribbon, about five and one-half (5½) inches long, of the same shade, quality, and width as the cap ribbon, to be sewed on left-hand side; ends of cap ribbon to be attached to bow.

Diameter of crown (on top).

6⅝, 6¾, 6⅞ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10¼ inches.

7, 7⅛ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10½ inches.

7¼, 7⅜, 7½, 7⅝ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10¾ inches.

Flat Cap_Interior TACOMA_Cap Detail

Grommet.—Of steel corset wire not less than three-eighths (⅜) nor more than one-half (½) of an inch wide, covered with sheeting or other suitable material.

Cap ribbon (Pl. XI, fig. 3).—Black silk ribbon, one and one half (l½) inches wide. The name of the vessel to which the wearer  is attached, in plain block letters one-half (½) of an inch in height, preceded by the letters U. S. S., to be woven in gilt thread through the ribbon.

Jersey and hat

Jersey and cap.

(e) For bandsmen (Pl. I, figs. 4 and 6).—Same as for enlisted men of the Marine Corps, excepting that a lyre device of white metal same as for helmet shall be worn in front and the side buttons  shall be small navy fire-gilt buttons. White cap covers are to be made of white linen, same as for enlisted men of the Marine Corps.

White Hat.

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen.—Of well-shrunken bleached cotton drill.

7942

Watch Cap.

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen (PL I, fig. 7).—Knit of dark navy-blue worsted, to  be all wool, closely woven, conical in shape, ten (10) inches long, with a hem two and one-half (2½) inches deep at the bottom.

Jersey.

For all enlisted men (Pl. II, fig. 1).—Knit of dark navy-blue worsted, dyed in the yarn, to come well down over the hips; to have full-length sleeves; neck opening eight (8) inches wide, strengthened with a flat double thickness of worsted one and one-half (1½) inches deep; total weight to be not less than one and one-half (1½) pounds.

Overcoat.

For all enlisted men, except bandsmen (Pl. III, figs. 1 and 2).— Heavy dark navy-blue cloth, lined with dark-blue flannel, the bot­tom of the skirt to reach the tips of fingers, arm hanging by the     side in its natural position, double-breasted, made to button to the neck, with rolling collar, same material as the coat, and broad enough to protect the ears when turned up. Five large-size black navy buttons on each front, the lower buttons to be placed on a line with the opening of the horizontal pocket, the others to be equally spaced up to the throat. An outside pocket in each breast, the openings to be up and down, and the larger part of the openings to be level with the elbow.

A horizontal pocket, with flap-cover, shall be placed in each front below the line of the waist. Overcoat to be worn completely but­toned.

Whites

From 1897 Uniform Regulations

Dress Jumper.

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen (Pl. VII, figs. 1 and 2).—Of bleached cotton drill of about seven (7) ounces, to descend from two (2) to three (3) inches below the hip. Collar and cuffs of light quality, dark navy-blue flannel, double thickness, of same pattern and trimmed in same  manner  as  in  the  blue  overshirt;   the doubling on back and breast, the sleeves, pocket, and crow’s feet will be made the same as in the blue overshirt, except that the materials will be white. There will be no breast piece in the neck opening. The same but­-tons to be used on cuffs as on the overshirt.

Dress White_Collar Detail

Rear Collar

Dress White_Collar Detail_Front

Front Detail

Dress White_Cuff Detail

Cuff detail

Dress White_Jumper

Side view

Undress Jumper.

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen (Pl. VII, figs. 3 and 4).—Entirely of white un­bleached drill of about eight (8) ounces; to descend from two (2)               to three (3) inches below the hip; collar same size as that of blue overshirt; bottom of sleeves to be cut off square just above the wrists; pocket to be overlaid on the left side.

NEW YORK-Sailors

White Dress Trousers.

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, stewards, officers’ cooks, and bandsmen.—Of bleached cotton drill weighing about seven (7) ounces, shape and sizes same as for blue-cloth trousers, but to be made with a “fly” front. Lacing in the back to be of five-eighths (f) inch cotton tape.

White Undress Trousers.

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen.—Of unbleached cotton drill of eight (8) ounces; cut and make-up same as white dress trousers.

Additional Items

Undershirt (Heavy).

For all enlisted men.—Of dark navy blue flannel, of about eleven (11) ounces, cut square across the breast; to be opened in front on the right-hand side of the neck by a slit from eight (8) to ten (10) inches deep, fastened with two (2) flat black buttons. Sleeves to be cut tapering.

Undershirt_Heavy_UniRegs_1897_B

Undershirt, Blue Flannel

Undershirt Pattern 1897

Pattern for Blue Undershirt, 1897 Uniform Regulations

UndershirtHeavy_Detail

Enlisted man wearing the undershirt on BROOKLYN, 1897

Undershirt (Light).

For all enlisted men.—Knit material of wool and cotton, containing enough of the latter to prevent shrinkage, bleached white, the sleeves not to come below the elbow.

Shoes.

For all enlisted men.—Of black calfskin; both high and low; heels broad and low; soles broad and thick; strongly curved on outside and straight on inside; thin leather lining; the high shoes to have full tongue stitched water-tight to the flaps; shoe strings to be of strong leather.

Neckerchief.

For all enlisted men except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen.—Of black silk, thirty-six (36) inches square.

Cravat.

For chief petty officers, stewards, officers’ cooks, and bandsmen.— Of black ribbed silk, not more than thirty-six (36) nor less than thirty-two (32) inches long, and not more than one and one-eighth (l⅛) inches nor less than seven-eighths (⅞) of an inch wide, of uniform width.

Knife Lanyard.

For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen (Pl. XI, fig. 1).—Of bleached white cotton. To be flat sennit, one-half (½) to nine-sixteenths (9/16) of an inch wide, tightly laid up; to have a turk’s head slide; and to belong enough, when around the neck, to allow the knife to be used with arm extended.

Knife lanyard, cap tally, continuous service stripe

Knife lanyard, cap tally, continuous service stripe

Leggings.

For all enlisted men (Pl. XII, fig. 3).—Tan-colored cotton duck, with strip of leather to go under the shoe and fasten with a buckle; fastenings to be on the inside.

Buttons.

Black (PL XIII, figs. 1, 2, and 3).—Large size, one and three-eighths (1⅜) inches in diameter; medium size, three-quarters (¾) of   an inch in diameter; small size, five-eighths (⅝) of an inch in diameter.

Organizational Clothing

This refers to items not part of regular uniform allowance, issued to men at no extra cost. These items were meant to be worn while at work, where normal uniforms would be soiled and ruined.  Dungarees unofficially came into use for engineers, firemen, and gunner’s mates. While there are no citations in period uniform regulations of the 1880’s and 90’s, they are well documented in many photographs of the time.

Dungaree Shirt and Trouser, 1897

Dungaree Shirt and Trouser, 1897

Uniform Regulations from 1905 explicitly detail who may wear dungarees and when:

48. Dungarees may be worn on board cruising vessels:

(a) By the engineer and dynamo-room force while on duty.

(b) By gunner’s mates, turret captains, electricians, mechanics and men regularly detailed as helpers or strikers in turrets or in care of machinery below decks, instead of white working dress, while employed at work that would damage the white uniform.

(c) By the engineer crew of steamers and power boats.

Dungarees shall not be worn nor had in possession bu other men.

49. Officers shall limit their wearing of dungarees to the actual requirements of duty. They shall not wear them for duty above decks for which worn blue or white clothing would suffice.

50. Dungarees shall be worn by officers and men as a complete suit, with the hat or cap prescribed for the day. They shall not be worn at mess, except by engineer and dynamo-room force about to go on watch and engineer crews of steamers, and only when the dungaree suit are clean.

51. Submarine vessels’ officers and crews may wear dungaree suits when on duty on board submarines. Officers and crews of other torpedo vessels shall conform to the regulations for other types of vessels concerning wearing of dungarees.

Dungaree Shirt, 1897

Dungaree Shirt, 1897

The first official specification and description of dungarees in Uniform regulations appears in 1905:

DUNGAREES (Pls XXIV.)

Jumpers to be made of blue denim 6 1/2 to 7 ounces, neck opening 7 inches. Sleeves to be from 17 to 22 1/2 inches in circumference, joining the body of the jumper as nearly as possible at the point of the shoulder; to the lower edge of the sleeves plain cuffs will be sewed.

Collar of of double thickness , to be rolling, 3 1/2 to 4 inches deep at the back of the neck and tapering to the bottom of the neck opening.

Cuffs of double thickness, plain, 2 inches deep, with wrist slits extending 4 inches above the upper edge of the cuff. Each cuff to be fastened with one black metal button.

Skirt to descend from 3 to 5 inches below the hips , to have two overlaid pockets, one on each side. The bottoms of the pockets to be on a line with the hem of the skirt, which is to be 1 1/2 inches deep. Two eyelets to be worked in on each side of the jumper three-fourths inch from the bottom of the skirt, and 1 inch on each side of the side seam.”

Trousers to be made of blue denim of about 6 1/2 to 7 ounces; one seam on each leg on the inside; fly front, buttoned with four black black metal buttons, and gusset at center back secured with one metal buckle; two top pockets, and one patch pocket on the right hip.

Dungaree Jumper and trouser, circa WWI

PROMETHEUS- machine shop 1912

PROMETHEUS Machine Shop, 1912

Collar detail

Dungaree Jumper, collar detail.

Breast Vee Detail

Dungaree Jumper V detail.

Demin Jumper_front

Dungaree Jumper, WW I period, overall view, front.

Demin Jumper_rear

Dungaree Jumper, WW I period, overall view, rear.

Shoulder seam detail

Dungaree Jumper, WW I period, shoulder seam detail.

Rating Badges

From 1897 Uniform Regulations

All petty officers are to wear on the outer garment a rating badge, consisting of a spread eagle above a class chevron. Petty officers of the starboard watch are to wear the badge on the right arm, and those of the port watch on the left arm, halfway between the shoulder and elbow.

The chevrons are to be made of stripes of scarlet cloth, three-eighths (⅜) of an inch wide, separated one-quarter (¼) of an inch, and sewed flat without padding, in a suitable manner, but not necessarily with black stitching, as shown in Plates XV and XVI. Badge as made up to cover a field three and one-quarter (3¼) inches broad. Chief petty officers to wear three (3) stripes with an arch of one (1) stripe forming the arc of a circle between the ends of the upper stripe of chevron, the outside radius of the circle being one and seven-eighths (l⅞) inches; the specialty mark to be in the center of the field under the arch, and to be entirely included in a circle one (1) inch in diameter; the eagle to rest on the center of the top of the arch (Pl. XV, fig. 1). Petty officers, first class, to wear three (3) stripes in the chevron (PL XV, fig. 2); second class, two (2) stripes (Pl. XVI, fig. 1); and third class, one (1) stripe (Pl. XVI, fig. 2); the specialty mark to be in the center of the field in the angle of the upper stripe, and the eagle to be one and one-half (1½) inches above the angle and just above the specialty mark.

For permanent petty officers holding three consecutive good-conduct badges, the chevrons are to be made of gold lace instead of scarlet cloth.

On blue clothing the eagle and specialty marks are to be worked in white, and on white clothing in blue.

The specialty marks are shown in Plates XVII and XVIII, as follows:

Plate  XVII.

Masters-at-arms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .         Fig. 1

Boatswains’ mates, coxswain  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          Fig. 2

Quartermasters  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          Fig. 3

Gunners’ mates  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          Fig. 4

Seaman gunner  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .          Fig. 5

Chief yeoman  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .           Fig. 6

Apothecary  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .           Fig. 7

Yeoman, first, second, or third class  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  Fig. 8

XVII

PLATE XVII

Plate XVIII.

Printer  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 1

Schoolmaster   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 1

Bandsman  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 2

Machinists, boiler maker   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 3

Water tender, coppersmith  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 3

Oiler  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 3

Carpenters’ mates  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 4

Plumber and fitter, painter  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fig. 4

Blacksmith  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 5

Sailmaker’s mate  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fig. 6

PLATE XVIII

PLATE XVIII

The specialty mark for gun captains shall be a foul anchor placed perpendicularly.

Marks.

Seaman-gunner mark (Pl. XVII, fig. 5).—Every enlisted man who has qualified as a seaman gunner is to wear the specialty mark so placed that the top comes one (1) inch below the point of the chevron, or, if not a petty officer, in place of the rating badge.

The apprentice mark (Pl. XIII, fig. 4).—An apprentice mark two (2) inches long, worked in white on blue clothes, and in blue on white clothes, is to be worn by all enlisted persons who belong to or have passed through the ratings of apprentice in the Navy. On the over-shirt and jumper, it is to be worn on the breast, two (2) inches below the neck opening. On all coats, except overcoats, it is to be worn on the outside of the same sleeve as the rating badge, halfway between the elbow and wrist.

The watch mark is to be worn by all enlisted men, except petty officers, officers’ messmen, and bandsmen.

It is to consist of a strip of braid three-eighths (⅜) of an inch wide, white on blue shirts, and blue on white shirts, placed on the shoulder seam of the sleeve and extending entirely around the arm. For first and second class firemen and coal passers, the braid is to  be red on both blue and white shirts, and of the same width and disposition as above. The men of the starboard watch are to wear   the mark on the right sleeve; those of the port watch are to wear it on the left sleeve.

Continuous-service marks, of scarlet cloth, eight (8) inches long, the side edges being turned under until they meet on the underside, to show a width of three-eighths (⅜) of an inch, to be worn on left sleeve diagonally across the outside of forearm at an angle  of forty-five (45) degrees, one for each complete reenlistment for three (3) years under continuous service, one-quarter (¼) of an inch apart. On coats and white jumpers, the lower end of first stripe  will  not be less than two (2) inches from the cuff edge of the sleeve; on the blue overshirt it will end four (4) inches above the upper edge of the cuff.

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